Name

UEDA, Michiko

Official Title

Associate Professor

Affiliation

(School of Political Science and Economics)

Contact Information

Mail Address

Mail Address
mueda@waseda.jp

Sub-affiliation

Affiliated Institutes

ソーシャルメディアデータ研究所

研究所員 2016-

ソーシャル&ヒューマン・キャピタル研究所

研究所員 2017-

Educational background・Degree

Degree

Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Award

Research Award

2019/02Conferment Institution:Waseda University

Best Paper Award (Japanese Journal of Electoral Studies)

2013/08Conferment Institution:Japanese Association of Electoral Studies

The Jewell-Loewenberg Award

2008/09Conferment Institution:American Political Science Association

Paper

Physical multimorbidity and suicidal behavior in the general population in the United States

Stickley, Andrew; Koyanagi, Ai; Ueda, Michiko; Inoue, Yosuke; Waldman, Kyle; Oh, Hans

Journal of Affective Disorders Peer Review Yes 260p.604 - 6092020/01-

DOIlink

Detail

Outline:Background As yet, there has been little research on the association between physical multimorbidity (the co-occurrence of two or more physical illnesses) and suicide, and results have been mixed. This study examined if physical multimorbidity is associated with suicidal behavior in the general population in the United States. Method Data were analyzed from 15,311 adults that were obtained from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES). Information was obtained on nine self-reported physical health conditions and lifetime suicidal behavior (suicidal ideation, plan, and attempts). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations. Results An increasing number of physical health conditions was associated with higher odds for suicidal behavior. Compared to those with no physical conditions, individuals with ≥ 4 physical illnesses had 2.99, 4.82, and 4.39 times higher odds for reporting suicidal ideation, a suicide plan, and suicide attempts, respectively. An interaction analysis showed that for suicide attempts the association was stronger in younger rather than older adults. Limitations The data were cross-sectional and information on physical conditions and suicidal behavior was self-reported and may have been subject to reporting bias. Conclusions As multimorbidity has increased in recent decades in the United States, alerting medical practitioners to the increased risk of suicidal behavior in adults who have multiple medical conditions as well as screening for suicidality in this group may be important preventive measures to help reduce suicidal behavior in the general population.

Age relative to school class peers and emotional well-being in 10-year-olds

Shuntaro Ando , Satoshi Usami, Tetsuya Matsubayashi, Michiko Ueda, Shinsuke Koike, Syudo Yamasaki, Shinya Fujikawa, Tsukasa Sasaki, Mariko Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, George Patton, Kiyoto Kasai, Atsushi Nishida

PLOS ONE Peer Review Yes 2019/03-2019/03

link

Assessing the Quality of Media Reporting of Suicide Deaths in Bangladesh Against World Health Organization Guidelines

S. M.Yasir Arafat, Murad M. Khan, Thomas Niederkrotenthaler, Michiko Ueda, Gregory Armstrong

Crisis Peer Review Yes 2019/01-

DOIlink

Detail

Outline:Background: Media reporting of suicide events has thus far gone without sufficient scrutiny in Bangladesh. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of newspaper reporting of suicides in Bangladesh against international guidelines. Methods: We used content analysis to assess the quality of suicide reporting in six daily newspapers in Bangladesh. The newspapers were hand-searched between November 2016 and April 2017 and 327 articles reporting on suicide deaths were retrieved. Results: The mean number of suicide articles per day per newspaper was 0.3 (range across newspapers 0.11–0.70) and the mean length was 11.3 sentences. Harmful reporting practices were very common (for example, a detailed suicide method was reported in 75.5% of articles) while almost no potentially helpful reporting practices were observed (for example, no articles gave contact details for a suicide support service). Limitations: The findings are limited to print mass media. Conclusions: We observed that explicit and simplistic reports of suicide deaths were frequently observed in newspapers in Bangladesh. Attempts should be made to understand the perspectives of media professionals in relation to suicide reporting, and to devise strategies to boost the positive contribution that media can make to suicide prevention in this context.

Suicide by persons with foreign background in Japan

Ueda, Michiko; Yoshikawa, Kanako; Matubayashi, Tetsuya

PLOS ONE Peer Review Yes 14(2) 2019/02-2019/02

DOIlink

Diurnal variation in suicide timing by age and gender: evidence from Japan across 41 years

Boo, Jeremy; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

Journal of Affective Disorders Peer Review Yes 2432019/01-

DOIlink

Detail

Outline:Background: Previous research on hourly diurnal variation in suicide frequency has often suffered from geographical and time-span limitations in the data. We studied diurnal and daily variations of suicide by analyzing a large dataset based on the national death registry in Japan between 1974 and 2014. Methods: The diurnal and daily patterns of 873,268 suicide deaths over 41 years were examined by sex and age group through Poisson regression and visual inspection. We also investigated whether these patterns are related to Japan's economic conditions. Results: Suicide by middle-aged males was most frequent in the early morning especially on Mondays after the end of Japan's high growth period. We also observed large midnight peaks in suicides among young and middle-aged males. The proportion of early morning suicide deaths by young and middle-aged males increased as the country's unemployment rose. Females and elderly males were more likely to die by suicide during the day than at night. Limitation: Our study examined time of death, not time of suicide attempt. It is possible that there is a discrepancy between the two. Conclusions: Different subpopulations die by suicide at different times of the day and days of the week. Time patterns of suicide varied considerably over time, suggesting that they cannot be explained by biological circadian rhythm alone. Our findings suggest that the patterns are partly explained by economic conditions. Future suicide prevention efforts should consider the time patterns of suicide unique to each subpopulation, especially when economic growth is depressed.

Tracking the Werther Effect on social media: Emotional responses to prominent suicide deaths on twitter and subsequent increases in suicide

Fahey, Robert A; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Michiko, Ueda

Social Science and Medicine Peer Review Yes 2192018/12-2018/12

DOIlink

Detail

Outline:Rises in suicide rates following media reports of the deaths by suicide of public figures are a well-documented phenomenon. However, it remains unclear why, or by what exact mechanism, celebrity suicides act to increase suicidal risk in the wider public due to the lack of data showing how the public understands and reacts to the suicide of well-known figures. This study used a supervised machine learning approach to investigate the emotional content of almost 1 million messages sent on Twitter related to the suicides of 18 prominent individuals in Japan between 2010 and 2014. The results revealed that different demographic characteristics of the deceased person (age, gender, and occupation) resulted in significant differences in emotional response; notably that the suicides of younger people, of women and of people in entertainment careers created more emotional responses (measured as a ratio of emotionally-coded tweets within the overall volume of tweets for each case) than for older people, men, and those in other careers. Moreover, certain types of emotional response were shown to correlate to subsequent rises in the national suicide counts, with “surprised” reactions being positively correlated with the suicide counts, while a high proportion of polite messages of condolence were negatively correlated. The study demonstrates the importance of, and describes a methodology for, considering the content of social media messages, not just their volume, in research into the mechanism by which these widely-reported deaths increase suicide risk in the broader public.

Tweeting celebrity suicides: Users’ reaction to prominent suicide deaths on Twitter and subsequent increases in actual suicides

Ueda, Michiko; Mori, Kota; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Sawada, Yasuyuki

Social Science and Medicine Peer Review Yes 189p.158 - 1662017/09-2017/09

DOIScopus

Detail

ISSN:02779536

Outline:© 2017 Elsevier Ltd A substantial amount of evidence indicates that news coverage of suicide deaths by celebrities is followed by an increase in suicide rates, suggesting a copycat behavior. However, the underlying process by which celebrity status and media coverage leads to increases in subsequent suicides is still unclear. This study collected over 1 million individual messages (“tweets”) posted on Twitter that were related to 26 prominent figures in Japan who died by suicide between 2010 and 2014 and investigated whether media reports on suicide deaths that generated a greater level of reactions by the public are likely to be followed by a larger increase in actual suicides. We also compared the number of Twitter posts and the number of media reports in newspaper and on television to understand whether the number of messages on Twitter in response to the deaths corresponds to the amount of coverage in the traditional media. Using daily data from Japan's national death registry between 2010 and 2014, our analysis found an increase in actual suicides only when suicide deaths generated a large reaction from Twitter users. In contrast, no discernible increase in suicide counts was observed when the analysis included suicide deaths to which Twitter users did not show much interest, even when these deaths were covered considerably by the traditional media. This study also found suicides by relatively young entertainers generated a large number of posts on Twitter. This sharply contrasts with the relatively smaller volume of reaction to them generated by traditional forms of media, which focuses more on the deaths of non-entertainers. The results of this study strongly suggest that it is not sufficient to examine only traditional news media when investigating the impact of media reports on actual suicides.

School and seasonality in youth suicide: evidence from Japan

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko; Yoshikawa, Kanako

Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Peer Review Yes 70(11) p.1122 - 11272016/11-2016/11

DOI

Detail

Outline:Background: Seasonality in youth suicide has been speculated to be associated with the school calendar, as it tends to increase at the beginning of the academic year or after a long break, but robust empirical evidence remains scarce. Methods: We examined the nationwide death records in the Vital Statistics of Japan to investigate the seasonal patterns of suicide among youth. Our data set included 108 968 suicides by individuals who died at 6-26 years of age between 1974 and 2014 in Japan. The daily frequencies of death were plotted against the Japanese school calendar, which has little regional and temporal variations. We also estimated a Poisson regression model to uncover the cyclical patterns of suicide deaths. Results: We found that the frequencies of suicide by middle school students (ages 12-15 years) and high school students (ages 15-18 years) sharply increased around the dates when a school session began in April and September. These tended to be low during school breaks. The results of regression analysis suggested middle school students were more than twice as likely to die by suicide when the summer break ended and the second semester began, compared with the baseline week in July. Similarly, the frequency of suicide for high school students also increased by similar to 40% at the end of the summer break. Importantly, no such pattern was found for those aged 18-26 years. Conclusions: Our findings strongly indicate that the cyclical pattern of youth suicide is closely related to the school calendar.

Legislative term limits and government spending: Theory and evidence from the United States

Asako, Yasushi; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy Peer Review Yes 16(3) p.1501 - 15382016/09-2016/09

DOIScopus

Detail

Outline:© by De Gruyter 2016.What are the fiscal consequences of legislative term limits? To answer this question, we first develop a legislative bargaining model that describes negotiations over the allocation of distributive projects among legislators with different levels of seniority. Building on several predictions from the model, we develop two hypotheses for empirical testing. First, the adoption of term limits that results in a larger reduction in the variance of seniority within a legislature increases the amount of government spending. Second, legislatures that adopt stricter term limits increase the amount of government spending, while legislatures that adopt moderate term limits show no change in the amount. We provide evidence for these hypotheses using panel data for 49 US state legislatures between 1980 and 2010.

Suicides and accidents on birthdays: Evidence from Japan

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

Social Science and Medicine Peer Review Yes 159p.61 - 722016/06-2016/06

DOI

The effectiveness of platform screen doors for the prevention of subway suicides in South Korea

Chung, Yong Woon; Kang, Sung Jin; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Michiko

Journal of Affective Disorders Peer Review Yes 194p.80 - 832016/04-2016/04

DOI

Relative age in school and suicide among young individuals in Japan: A regression discontinuity approach

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

PLOS ONE Peer Review Yes 10(8) 2015/08-2015/08

DOI

The effectiveness of installing physical barriers for preventing railway suicides and accidents: Evidence from Japan

Ueda, Michiko; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya

Journal of Affective Disorders Peer Review Yes 178p.1 - 42015/06-2015/06

DOI

Dynastic politicians: Theory and evidence from Japan

Asako, Yasushi; Iida, Takeshi; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

Japanese Journal of Political Science Peer Review Yes 16(1) p.5 - 322015/03-2015/03

DOI

District population size and candidates' vote-seeking strategies: Evidence from Japan

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko; Uekami, Takayoshi

Journal of Elections Public Opinion and Parties Peer Review Yes 25(2) p.159 - 1772015-2015

DOI

Does the installation of blue lights on train platforms shift suicide to another station?: Evidence from Japan

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Michiko

Journal of Affective Disorders Peer Review Yes 169p.57 - 602014/12-2014/12

DOI

Maternal work conditions, socioeconomic and educational status, and vaccination of children: A community-based household survey in Japan

Ueda, Michiko; Kondo, Naoki; Takada, Misato; Hashimoto, Hideki

Preventive Medicine Peer Review Yes 66p.17 - 212014/09-2014/09

DOI

Disability and voting

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

Disability and Health Journal Peer Review Yes 7(3) p.285 - 2912014/07-2014/07

DOI

The effects of media reports of suicides by well-known figures between 1989 and 2010 in Japan

Ueda, Michiko; Mori, Kota; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya

International Journal of Epidemiology Peer Review Yes 43(2) p.623 - 6292014/04-2014/04

DOI

The effect of public awareness campaigns on suicides: Evidence from Nagoya, Japan

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko; Sawada, Yasuyuki

Journal of Affective Disorders Peer Review Yes 152p.526 - 5292014/01-2014/01

DOI

Does the installation of blue lights on train platforms prevent suicide? A before-and-after observational study from Japan

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Michiko

Journal of Affective Disorders Peer Review Yes 147(1-3) p.385 - 3882013/05-2013/05

DOI

Natural disasters and suicide: Evidence from Japan

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Michiko

Social Science and Medicine Peer Review Yes 82p.126 - 1332013/04-2013/04

DOI

Government partisanship and human well-being

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

Social Indicators Research Peer Review Yes 107(1) p.127 - 1482012/05-2012/05

DOI

The effect of national suicide prevention programs on suicide rates in 21 OECD nations

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

Social Science and Medicine Peer Review Yes 73(9) p.1395 - 14002011/11-2011/11

DOI

The effects of uncontested elections on legislator performance

Konisky, David M; Ueda, Michiko

Legislative Studies Quarterly Peer Review Yes 36(2) p.199 - 2292011/05-2011/05

DOI

Political knowledge and the use of candidate race as a voting cue

Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko

American Politics Research Peer Review Yes 39(2) p.380 - 4132011/03-2011/03

DOI

Do multimember districts lead to free-riding?

Snyder, James M.; Ueda, Michiko

Legislative Studies Quarterly Peer Review Yes 32(4) p.649 - 6792007/11-2007/11

DOI

Party and incumbency cues in voting: Are they substitutes?

Ansolabehere, Stephen; Hirano, Shigeo; Snyder, James M., Jr.; Ueda, Michiko

Quarterly Journal of Political Science Peer Review Yes 1(2) p.119 - 1372006-2006

DOI

Did firms profit from soft money?

Stephen Ansolabehere; Snyder, James M., Jr.; Ueda, Michiko

Election Law Jaurnal 3(2) p.193 - 1982004-2004

Incomplete observation, filtering, and the home bias puzzle

Ueda, Michiko

Economics Letters Peer Review Yes 62(1) p.75 - 801999/01-1999/01

DOI

Books And Publication

Economic Analysis of Suicide Prevention

Yasuyuki Sawada; Michiko Ueda; Tetsuya Matsubayashi

Springer2017/10-2017/10

LINK

Detali

ISBN:978-981-10-1499-4

Towards Evidence-based Suicide Prevention

Sawada, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Michiko; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya

Yuhikaku2013/06-2013/06

Detali

Total Number of Pages:238ISBN:978-4641173910

Research Grants & Projects

Grant-in-aids for Scientific Research Adoption Situation

Research Classification:Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B)

Empirical Analysis of Suicide Prevention Policies

2017/04-2020/03

Allocation Class:¥16250000

Research Fund Acceptance Situation

Providers:Japan Support Center for Suicide CountermeasuresSystem:Innovative Research Program on Suicide Countermeasures

Socio-economic environment and suicide2019/04-2020/03

Representative

Providers:The Mitsubishi Foundation

Media Reporting on Suicide: Analysis of Cross-National Data2018/10-2019/09

Representative

Providers:Japan Support Center for Suicide CountermeasuresSystem:Innovative Research Program on Suicide Countermeasures

Socioeconomic factors of suicide (Japan)2018/07-2019/03

Representative

Providers:Japan Support Center for Suicide CountermeasuresSystem:Innovative Research Program on Suicide Countermeasures

International Comparison of Suicide Prevention Measures2017/10-2018/03

Representative

On-campus Research System

Special Research Project

自殺報道と自殺の連鎖:ツイッターデータを用いたメカニズム分析

2016Collaborator:松林哲也, 澤田康幸

Research Results Outline:本研究は著名人の自殺に関する SNS(ソーシャルネットワークサービス)上での人々の反応を分析した。具体的には、2010年から2014年に自殺で亡くなっ本研究は著名人の自殺に関する SNS(ソーシャルネットワークサービス)上での人々の反応を分析した。具体的には、2010年から2014年に自殺で亡くなった23名の著名人の死亡記事が報道された前後におけるツイッターでの投稿数を分析した。その結果、自殺報...本研究は著名人の自殺に関する SNS(ソーシャルネットワークサービス)上での人々の反応を分析した。具体的には、2010年から2014年に自殺で亡くなった23名の著名人の死亡記事が報道された前後におけるツイッターでの投稿数を分析した。その結果、自殺報道直後に死亡した著名人に関するツイッターでの投稿数は急増すること、しかしすべての著名人についての投稿数が増えるわけではなく、新聞などでは取り上げられているものの、ツイッターの利用者の間でほとんど話題になっていない著名人の自殺もあることが明らかになった。さらに、ツイッター上で話題になった著名人の自殺報道の後には自殺者数がより多く増加する傾向も明らかになった。

Lecture Course

Course TitleSchoolYearTerm
Research Methods in Political Science (Empirical Analysis) [E] 02School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Advanced Topics in Economics: Political Economy of Mass Media: Topics and Methods [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019an intensive course(fall)
Advanced Seminar I [E] 11School of Political Science and Economics2019spring semester
Advanced Seminar II [E] 11School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Advanced Seminar III [E] 11School of Political Science and Economics2019spring semester
Advanced Seminar IV [E] 11School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Thesis [E] 11School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Thesis [E] 11School of Political Science and Economics2019spring semester
Seminar on Empirical Political Economy AGraduate School of Political Science2019spring semester
Seminar on Empirical Political Economy BGraduate School of Political Science2019fall semester
Research Methods in Political Science (Empirical Analysis)Graduate School of Political Science2019fall semester
Quantitative Research Methods IGraduate School of Political Science2019summer quarter
Reading Seminar in PoliticsGraduate School of Political Science2019fall semester
Seminar on Empirical Political EconomyGraduate School of Political Science2019spring semester
Seminar on Empirical Political EconomyGraduate School of Political Science2019fall semester
Advanced Topics in Political Economy: Political Economy of Traditional and New Media(PS・Durante)Graduate School of Political Science2019an intensive course(fall)
Research Methods in Political Science (Empirical Analysis)Graduate School of Economics2019fall semester
Reading Seminar in Politics (Jpn)Graduate School of Economics2019fall semester
Advanced Topics in Political Economy: Political Economy of Mass Media: Topics and Methods(Durante)Graduate School of Economics2019an intensive course(fall)