Name

KELLAM, Marisa Andrea

Official Title

Associate Professor

Affiliation

(School of Political Science and Economics)

Profile

Marisa Kellam is an associate professor at Waseda University, where she researches the quality of democracy in Latin America. Her research links institutional analysis to various governance outcomes in democracies within three lines of inquiry: political parties and coalitional politics; mass electoral behavior and party system change; and democratic accountability and media freedom. Marisa Kellam teaches international and Japanese students in the English-based degree programs of Waseda’s School of Political Science & Economics. After earning a Ph.D. in political science from UCLA, she spent several years as an assistant professor at Texas A&M University. She moved to Tokyo in 2013 with her Japanese husband and two children. Dedicated to her academic career and family, she engages daily in the pursuit of work-life balance.

Contact Information

Mail Address

Mail Address
kellam@waseda.jp

URL

Web Page URL

https://sites.google.com/site/marisakellam

Grant-in-aids for Scientific Researcher Number
30711866

Educational background・Degree

Educational background

1998/09 -2007/06 University of California, Los Angeles Political Science
1991/09 -1995/12 University of California, Santa Barbara Political Science and Latin American & Iberian Studies

Degree

Ph.D. UCLA (United States of America) Politics

Career

2016-Waseda UniversitySchool of Political Science & EconomicsAssociate Professor
2013-2016Waseda UniversityWaseda Institute for Advanced StudyAssociate Professor (without Tenure)
2007-2013Texas A&M UniversityDepartment of Political ScienceAssistant Professor

Academic Society Joined

American Political Science Association

International Political Science Association

Japanese Association of Comparative Politics

Award

Best Student Paper, Latin American Political Institutions Section, Latin American Studies Association

2005

City Club Prize for academic achievement, First Place Recipient, University of California, Santa Barbara

1996

Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society

1995

Research Field

Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research classification

Social sciences / Politics / Politics

Paper

Silencing Critics: When and How Presidents Restrict Media Freedom in Democracies

KELLAM, Marisa and Elizabeth A. STEIN

Comparative Political Studies 49(1) p.36 - 772016-

DOI

Why Pre-Electoral Coalitions in Presidential Systems?

KELLAM, Marisa

British Journal of Political Science

Programming Presidential Agendas: Partisan and Media Environments that Lead Presidents to Fight Crime and Corruption

STEIN, Elizabeth A. and KELLAM, Marisa

Political Communication 31(1) p.25 - 522014-

DOI

Suffrage Extensions and Voting Patterns in Latin America: Was Mobilization the Source of Decay?

KELLAM, Marisa

Latin American Politics & Society 55(4) 2013-

DOI

Parties for hire: How particularistic parties influence presidents' governing strategies

KELLAM, Marisa

Party Politics 2013/06-

DOI

The Nationalization of Electoral Change in the Americas

ALEMAN, Eduardo and KELLAM, Marisa

Electoral Studies 27(2) p.193 - 2122008-

DOI

Lecture And Oral

Press Coverage and Popular Protests: An Alternative Path to Presidential Accountability in Latin America?

Marisa Kellam and Elizabeth A. Stein

Western Political Science Association annual meeting2016/03/25

Media Freedom in Ecuador

Marisa Kellam

(Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE))Invitation Yes2015/12/04

Latin America’s Accountability Deficit Trap: Declining Political Competition and Declining Media Freedom

Marisa Kellam

(Keio University)Invitation Yes2015/10/03

The Nationalization of Presidential Elections in the Americas

Alemán, Eduardo and Marisa Kellam

The Nationalization of Electoral Politics: Frontiers of Research(University of Zurich)Invitation Yes2015/09/17

Winning Coalitions in Presidential Systems: Pre-Electoral Alliances and Post-Electoral Governments

Workshop on Political Institutions at Keio University2015/03/21

Corruption, Courts and Cartels: Why Federalism May Exacerbate Threats to Media Freedom in Latin America

American Political Science Association2014/09/01

Checking Presidents: Media Freedom and Political Accountability in Latin America

American Political Science Association2013/09/01

Winning Coalitions in Presidential Systems: Pre-Electoral Alliances and Post-Electoral Governments in Latin America

American Political Science Association2013/09/01

Research Grants & Projects

Grant-in-aids for Scientific Research Adoption Situation

Research Classification:

Parties for Hire: Non-Programmatic Parties in Coalitional Politics

2013/-0-2015/-0

Allocation Class:¥2210000

On-campus Research System

Special Research Project

Coalitional Instability and Government Accountability in Comparative Perspective

2013

Research Results Outline:The Waseda University Grant for Special Research Projects (for Newly-Hired The Waseda University Grant for Special Research Projects (for Newly-Hired Faculty) provided financial support for supplies ...The Waseda University Grant for Special Research Projects (for Newly-Hired Faculty) provided financial support for supplies and travel expenses related to my research on coalitional instability and government accountability. The goal of this project is the publication of a book which explains the role of non-programmatic political parties in electoral and governing coalitions and identifies the characteristics of partisan oppositions in the legislature that tend to strengthen their position as accountability actors relative to presidents in Latin America. With this goal in mind, during the 2013 fiscal year, I expanded my dataset on Latin American political parties and coalitions to include 12 countries through 2013, and carried out statistical analyses of these data. I presented preliminary results of this research at the American Political Science Association annual meeting in September 2013. I subsequently revised the analyses and edited the related manuscripts. Currently, I have one article-length manuscript that is under review, and much of this material will also appear as a chapter in the book. In addition, I am preparing to submit another co-authored article-length manuscript for review in March 2014. I believe that article publications related to the book will raise interest among publishers in the larger book project. I plan to meet with publishers in August/September 2014. Finally, I was awarded a KAKENHI grant (Research Activity Start-Up) for the funding period of September 2013 through April 2015 for research that builds upon this project.

Media Freedom and Democratic Accountability

2015Collaborator:Elizabeth A. Stein

Research Results Outline:This research grant (tokutei B) from Waseda University provided financial sThis research grant (tokutei B) from Waseda University provided financial support for my research project on democratic acco...This research grant (tokutei B) from Waseda University provided financial support for my research project on democratic accountability.  The goal of this project is to improve understanding of the deficit of accountability faced by many relatively young democracies in Latin America, Africa and Asia. Although free and fair elections occur with regular frequency in these countries, democratic elections do not in and of themselves guarantee accountability.  Accountability means that political leaders, once elected, remain responsive to their constituents and do not abuse their powers in office. This research project investigates, in particular, the relationship between the media and government accountability, highlighting diminished media freedom as both a consequence, and a cause, of accountability deficits in democracies.The grant funded travel to California, where I met my collaborator on this project, and together we consulted with professors of political science at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).  I also participated in the Western Political Science Association conference in San Diego, California. My co-author and I presented our research findings from this project and met with a book publisher to discuss our manuscript on media freedom and presidential accountability in Latin America.

Democracy In Conflict: Political Institutions, Media Wars and Accountability

2016Collaborator:Elizabeth A. Stein

Research Results Outline:This grant provided financial support for research on government-media relaThis grant provided financial support for research on government-media relations and political accountability in democratic ...This grant provided financial support for research on government-media relations and political accountability in democratic countries. The research contributes to a collaborative book project between the P.I. and Professor Elizabeth A. Stein, currently a postdoctoral scholar at the School of International and Global Studies at Indiana University (USA). The grant primarily funded travel for the primary investigator to spend one week at Indiana University for intensive writing and editing of the manuscript.This research project fills a gap in scholarly understanding of democratic leaders’ incentives and abilities to constrain the media’s autonomy.  The media play a vital role in democratic accountability by monitoring politicians’ behavior and policy performance, informing citizens, and sanctioning the abuse of power through their reporting. However, in the many young democracies around the globe, the autonomy of the media remains vulnerable and various political, economic, and legal conditions limit the freedom of the media. Severe conflicts between political leaders and the media – so called “media wars” – threaten the viability of democracy in some countries. On both theoretical and empirical grounds, the book project challenges the conventional wisdom that democratic institutions and procedures guarantee media freedom. 

Lecture Course

Course TitleSchoolYearTerm
Introduction to Political Analysis [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Advanced Topics in Political Science: Identity, Institutions and Order [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019an intensive course(spring)
Advanced Seminar I [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019spring semester
Advanced Seminar II [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Advanced Seminar III [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019spring semester
Advanced Seminar IV [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Thesis [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Thesis [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019spring semester
Political Institutions [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019spring semester
Global Leadership Fellows Program (GLFP): Directed Research Seminar - Theories and Methods of Political Science (Fall) [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019fall semester
Global Leadership Fellows Program (GLFP): Directed Research Seminar - Theories and Methods of Political Science (Spring) [E] 01School of Political Science and Economics2019spring semester
Seminar on Comparative Politics AGraduate School of Political Science2019spring semester
Seminar on Comparative Politics BGraduate School of Political Science2019fall semester
Political InstitutionsGraduate School of Political Science2019spring semester
Seminar on Comparative PoliticsGraduate School of Political Science2019spring semester
Seminar on Comparative PoliticsGraduate School of Political Science2019fall semester
Advanced Topics in Political Science: Identity, Institutions and OrderGraduate School of Political Science2019an intensive course(spring)