Name

NAGASHIMA, Kei

Official Title

Professor

Affiliation

(School of Human Sciences)

Contact Information

Mail Address

Mail Address
k-nagashima@waseda.jp

Address・Phone Number・Fax Number

Address
Mikajima 2-579-15, Tokorozawa, Saitama JAPAN
Phone Number
+81-4-2947-6918
Fax Number
+81-4-2947-6918

URL

Web Page URL

http://www.f.waseda.jp/k-nagashima/

Grant-in-aids for Scientific Researcher Number
40275194

Sub-affiliation

Sub-affiliation

Faculty of Human Sciences(Graduate School of Human Sciences)

Research Council (Research Organization)/Affiliated organization(Global Education Center)

Faculty of Commerce(School of Commerce)

Affiliated Institutes

応用脳科学研究所

研究所員 2009-2013

熱エネルギー変換工学・数学融合研究所

研究所員 2017-

アクティヴ・エイジング研究所

研究所員 2013-

ライフサポートイノベーション研究所

研究所員 2014-2014

環境医科学研究所

研究所員 2016-

Educational background・Degree

Educational background

-1986 Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Faculty of Medicine
-1995 Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School, Division of Medicine

Degree

(BLANK) Coursework

Career

1995-1998Postdoctoral associate Yale Univ. School of Med. and The John B. Pierce Laboratory
1998-1999Fellow, Royal North Shore Hospital
1999-2004Assistant Professor, School of Medicin, Osaka University
2004-Associate Professor, Professor, Faculty of Human Sciences, Waseda University

Academic Society Joined

Noth American Federation of Nueroscience

American Physiological Society

Research Field

Keywords

body temperature, body fluid, temperature sensation, circadian rhythm, sex hormones, exercise physiology

Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research classification

Medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy / Basic medicine / Environmental physiology (including physical medicine and nutritional physiology)

Cooperative Research Theme Desire

Neural mechanism involved in thermal comfort

Institution:Cooperative research with other research organization of universities, etc.

Research interests Career

2000-Clarify the neural mechanism involved in thermal comfort and behavioral thrmoregulation

Cooperative Research within Japan

Research for Blood Volume Regulation

Current Research Theme Keywords:blood volume,albumin,exercise

Individual research allowance

The impact of dehydration on behavioral thermoregulation

Current Research Theme Keywords:blood volume,osmolality,body temperature

Cooperative Research within Japan

Regulation of circadian rhysm for body temperature

Current Research Theme Keywords:vagus nerve,metabolism,body temperature food deprivation

Cooperative Research within Japan

Paper

Cold exposure and/or fasting modulate the relationship between sleep and body temperature rhythms in mice.

Sato N, Marui S, Ozaki M, Nagashima K.

Physiolgy&Behavior 149p.69 - 752015/10-

Estimation of the core temperature control during ambient temperature changes and the influence of circadian rhythm and metabolic conditions in mice.

Tokizawa K, Yoda T, Uchida Y, Kanosue K, Nagashima K.

Journal of Thermal Biology 51p.47 - 542015/07-

Effect of menstrual cycle on thermal perception and autonomic thermoregulatory responses during mild cold exposure.

Matsuda-Nakamura M, Yasuhara S, Nagashima K.

Journal of Physiological Sciences 2015/03-

Characteristics of activated neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus when mice become hypothermic during fasting and cold exposure

Yuki Uchida, ken Tokizawa, Kei Nagashima

Neuroscience Letters 579p.177 - 1822014/07-

水分補給

永島計

Tarzan 29(14) p.96 - 992014/07-

暑熱適応における恒常性の維持と破綻

永島計

体育の科学 64(7) p.456 - 4602014/07-

高体温症,低体温症の病体生理

永島 計

小児内科 46(3) p.310 - 3142014/03-

Protection of the brain against heat damage

Mayumi Matsuda-Nakamura and Kei Nagashima

The Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine 3(2) p.217 - 2212014/03-

DOI

Family Academy

2014 栄冠めざして Family p.52 - 55

スポーツ中の熱中症を防ごう

永島 計

少年写真新聞、中学保健ニュース 1561p.1 - 12013/05-

ヒトにおける体温調節の意味と意義

永島 計、中村真由美

人間科学研究 26(1) p.13 - 252013/01-

Relative importance of different surface regions for thermal comfort in humans

Nakamura M, Yoda T, Crawshaw LI, Kasuga M, Uchida Y, Tokizawa K, Nagashima K, Kanosue K

European Journal of Applied Physiology 113(1) p.63 - 762013/01-

DOI

体温と性差

永島 計、中村真由美

体育の科学 62(12) p.928 - 9332012/12-

Ghrelin induces time-dependent modulation of thermoregulation in the cold

Tokizawa K, Onoue Y, Uchida Y, Nagashima, K

Chronobiol Internat 29(6) p.736 - 7462012/06-

ヒトにおける体温の意味と意義

永島 計、松田(中村)真由美

人間科学研究 25(1) p.21 - 342012/03-

Hyperosmolality in the plasma modulates behavioral thermoregulation in mice: The quantitative and multilateral assessment using a new experimental system

Lin, C.-H., Tokizawa, K., Nakamura, M., Uchida, Y., Mori, H., Nagashima, K.

Physiology and Behavior 105(2) p.536 - 5432012/02-

DOI

Mechanisms of heat acclimation and tolerance induced by exercise training and heat exposure

Tokizawa K, Lin CH, Nagashima, K

J Phys Fitness Sports Med 1(2) p.343 - 3462012/02-

DOI

Tail position affects the body temperature of rats during cold exposure in a low-energy state

Uchida, Y., Tokizawa, K., Nakamura, M., Lin, C.-H., Nagashima, K.

Journal of Comparative Physiology A 198(2) p.89 - 952012/02-

DOI

Exercise and thermoregulation

Nagashima, Kei Tokizawa, Ken Uchida, Yuki Nakamura-Matsuda, Mayumi Lin, Chen-Hsien

The Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine 1(1) p.73 - 822012/01-

DOI

周術期の低体温:呼吸・循環への低体温の影響

永島 計、時澤 健、内田有希

LISA 19(1) p.14 - 172012/01-

Mild hypohydration induced by exercise in the heat attenuates autonomic thermoregulatory responses to the heat, but not thermal pleasantness in humans

Tokizawa, K., Yasuhara, S., Nakamura, M., Uchida, Y., Crawshaw, L.I., Nagashima, K.

Physiology and Behavior 100(4) p.340 - 3452010/04-

DOI

Estrogen modulates central and peripheral responses to cold in female rats

Uchida, Y., Kano, M., Yasuhara, S., Kobayashi, A., Tokizawa, K., Nagashima, K.

Journal of Physiological Sciences 60(2) p.151 - 1602010/02-

DOI

Concepts to utilize in describing thermoregulation and neurophysiological evidence for how the system works

Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Yoda, Tamae

European Journal of Applied Physiology 109(1) p.5 - 112010/05-2010/05

PubMedDOIScopus

Detail

ISSN:14396319

Outline:We would like to emphasize about the system involved with homeostatic maintenance of body temperature. First, the primary mission of the thermoregulatory system is to defend core temperature (T core ) against changes in ambient temperature (T a ), the most frequently encountered disturbance for the system. T a should be treated as a feedforward input to the system, which has not been adequately recognized by thermal physiologists. Second, homeostatic demands from outside the thermoregulatory system may require or produce an altered T core , such as fever (demand from the immune system). There are also conditions where some thermoregulatory effectors might be better not recruited due to demands from other homeostatic systems, such as during dehydration or fasting. Third, many experiments have supported the original assertion of Satinoff that multiple thermoregulatory effectors are controlled by different and relatively independent neuronal circuits. However, it would also be of value to be able to characterize strictly regulatory properties of the entire system by providing a clear definition for the level of regulation. Based on the assumption that T core is the regulated variable of the thermoregulatory system, regulated T core is defined as the T core that pertains within the range of normothermic T a (Gordon in temperature and toxicology: an integrative, comparative, and environmental approach, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2005), i.e., the T a range in which an animal maintains a stable T core . The proposed approach would facilitate the categorization and evaluation of how normal biological alterations, physiological stressors, and pathological conditions modify temperature regulation. In any case, of overriding importance is to recognize the means by which an alteration in T core (and modification of associated effector activities) increases the overall viability of the organism. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.

Estrogen in the medial preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus modulates cold responses in female rats.

Uchida Yuki;Tokizawa Ken;Nakamura Mayumi;Mori Hisae;Nagashima Kei

Estrogen in the medial preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus modulates cold responses in female rats. 1339p.49 - 592010-2010

PubMedDOI

Detail

ISSN:1872-6240

Outline::The present study examined the effect of the central administration of estrogen on responses to the cold. Estrogen or cholesterol was applied locally to the medial preoptic nucleus (MPO) or dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) of the hypothalamus in free-moving ovariectomized rats. Forty-eight hours after the application, rats had 2-h exposure at 10 or 25 degrees C. Body temperature (T(b)) and the tail surface temperature (T(tail)) were continuously measured by telemetry and thermography, respectively. The change of T(b) at 10 degrees C from the 25 degrees C baseline was higher in the estrogen application in the MPO than that in the cholesterol application; however, such difference was not observed in the DMH application. The uncoupling 1 protein mRNA level in the interscapular brown adipose tissue involved in non-shivering thermogenesis was not different between the estrogen and cholesterol applications in the MPO and DMH. T(tail) decreased in the cold, which was greater after the estrogen application in the MPO than after the cholesterol application. These results show that estrogen affects the MPO in female rats, changing T(b) in the cold. Moreover, suppression of heat loss from the tail may be involved in the mechanism.

Thermoregulation in the cold changes depending on the time of day and feeding condition: physiological and anatomical analyses of involved circadian mechanisms

Tokizawa, K., Uchida, Y., Nagashima, K.

Neuroscience 163(3) p.1377 - 13862009/03-

DOI

Regional differences in temperature sensation and thermal comfort in humans

Nakamura, M., Yoda, T., Crawshaw, L.I., Yasuhara, S., Saito, Y., Kasuga, M., Nagashima, K., Kanosue, K.

Journal of Applied Physiology 105(6) p.1897 - 19062008/10-

DOI

Effects of alcohol on autonomic responses and thermal sensation during cold exposure in humans

Yoda, T., Crawshaw, L.I., Saito, K., Nakamura, M., Nagashima, K., Kanosue, K.

ALCOHOL 42(3) p.207 - 2122008/03-

DOI

Effects of posture on peripheral vascular responses to lower body positive pressure

Nishiyasu, T., Hayashida, S., Kitano, A., Nagashima, K., Ichinose, M.

American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology 293(1) p.H670 - H6762007-

DOI

The median preoptic nucleus is involved in th facilitation of heat-escape/cold-seeking behaviour during systemic salt loading in rats "jointly worked"

Konishi, M., Kanosue, K., Kano, M., Kobayashi, A., Nagashima, K.

American Journal of Physiology 292(1) p.R150 - R1592007-

DOI

A new system for the analysis of thermal judgments: multipoint measurements of skin temperatures and temperature-related sensations and their joint visualization.

Nakamura Mayumi;Esaki Hidenori;Yoda Tamae;Yasuhara Saki;Kobayashi Akiko;Konishi Aki;Osawa Naoki;Nagashima Kei;Crawshaw Larry I;Kanosue Kazuyuki

The journal of physiological sciences : JPS 56(6) p.459 - 4642006-2006

PubMedDOI

Detail

ISSN:1880-6546

Outline::We report a new system for monitoring sensations of many body parts as well as comprehensively showing the distribution of overall skin temperature (T(sk)) and temperature-related sensations. The system consists of a console with 52 levers to report temperature-related sensations and software that facilitates the visualization of the distribution of T(sk) and temperature-related sensations by displaying them on a model of the human body. The system's utility was demonstrated with a physiological experiment involving three males and three females. They were exposed to step changes of ambient temperature from 23 degrees C to 33 degrees C. We measured T(sk) at 50 points, and the subjects concurrently provided estimates of local temperature sensation and thermal comfort/discomfort at 25 loci. This system greatly facilitates the perception and analysis of spatial relationships and differences in temperature and sensation in various areas of the body.

Central mechanisms for thermoregulation in a hot environment

Nagashima, K.

Industrial Health 44(3) p.359 - 3672006/03-

DOI

Effects of warming the lower back with a heat and steam generating sheet on thermoregulatory responses and sensation

Oda, H., Igaki, M., Ugajin T., Suzuki, A., Tshuchiya S., Nagashima, K., Iso, S., Kanosue, K.

日本気誌 43(1) p.43 - 502006-

Reflex activation of rat fusimotor neurons by body surface cooling, and its dependence on the medullary raphe "jointly worked"

Tanaka, M., Owens, N.C., Nagashima, K., Kanosue, K., McAllen, R.M.

Journal of Physiology 572(2) p.569 - 5832006/02-

DOI

Effects of alcohol on thermoregulation during mild heat exposure in humans "jointly worked"

Yoda, T., Crawshaw, L.I., Nakamura, M., Saito, K., Konishi, A., Nagashima, K., Uchida, S., Kanosue, K.

Alcohol 36(3) p.195 - 2002005/03-

DOI

Fos activation in hypothalamic neurons during cold or warm exposure: projections to periaqueductal gray matter

Yoshida, K., Konishi, M., Nagashima, K., Saper, C.B., Kanosue, K.

Neuroscience 133(4) p.1039 - 10462005-

DOI

The involvement of Cry1 and Cry2 genes in the thermoregulatory mechanisms for the circadian body temperature rhythm in mice "jointly worked"

Nagashima, K., Matsue, K., Konishi, M., Iidaka, C., Miyazaki, K., Ishida, N., Kanosue, K.

American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology 288p.R329 - R3352005-

DOI

Brain activation by thermal stimulation in humans studied with fMRI

Yagishita, T., Sadato, N., Okada, T., Taniguchi, A., Konishi, M., Nagashima, K., Yonekura, Y., Kanosue, K.

Elsevier Ergonomics Book Series 3 (C)p.17 - 202005-

体温調節のメカニズム(共著)

彼末一之、永島 計、小西あき

体育の科学 54(10) p.764 - 7682004/10-

Attenuation of metabolic heat production and cold-escape/warm-seeking behaviour during a cold exposure following systemic salt loading in rats "jointly worked"

Konishi, M., Nagashima, K., Asano, K., Kanosue, K.

Journal of Physiology 551(2) p.713 - 7202003-

DOI

Brain regions expressing Fos during thermoregulatory behavior in rats

Maruyama, M., Nishi, M., Konishi, M., Takashige, Y., Nagashima, K., Kiyohara, T., Kanosue, K.

American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology 285p.R1116 - R11232003-

DOI

Effects of fasting on thermoregulation processes and the daily oscillations in rats "jointly worked"

Nagashima, K., Nakai, S., Matsue, K., Konishi, M., Tanaka, M., Kanosue, K.

American Journal of Physiology 284p.R1486 - R14932003-

Involvement of the raphe pallidus in the suppresive effect of preoptic warming on non-shivering thermogenesis in rats

Taniguchi, A., Chen, X.-M., Nagashima, K., Tanaka, M., Kanosue, K.

Brain Research 966(1) p.103 - 1092003-

DOI

行動性体温調節

永島 計

人間科学研究 11(1) p.207 - 2182003-

Brain activation during whole body cooling in humans studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging "jointly worked"

Kanosue, K., Sadato, N., Okada, T., Yoda, T., Nakai, S., Yoshida, K., Hosono, T., Nagashima, K., Yagishita, T., Inoue, O., Kobayashi, K., Yonekura, Y.

Neuroscience Letter 329(2) p.157 - 1602002-

DOI

Fos Expression induced by warming the preoptic area in rats "jointly worked"

Yoshida, K., Maruyama, M., Hosono, T., Nagashima, K., Fukuda, Y., Gerstberger, R., Kanosue, K.

Brain Research 933(2) p.109 - 1172002-

DOI

Involvement of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in body temperature modulation by food deprivation in rats

Liu, S., Chen, X.-M., Yoda, T., Nagashima, K., Fukuda, Y., Kanosue, K.

Brain Research 929(1) p.26 - 362002-

DOI

Role of the medullary raphe in thermoregulatory vasomotor control in rats "jointly worked"

Tanaka, M., Nagashima, K., McAllen, R.M., Kanosue, K.

Journal of Physiology 540(2) p.657 - 6642002-

DOI

Systemic salt loading decreases body temperature and increases heat- escape/cold-seeking behaviour via the central AT1 and V1 receptors in rats "jointly worked"

Konishi, M., Nagashima, K., Kanosue, K.

Journal of Physiology 545(1) p.289 - 2962002-

DOI

The caudal periaqueductal gray participates in the activation of brown adipose tissue in rats. "jointly worked"

Chen, X.-M., Nishi, M., Taniguchi, A., Nagashima, K., Shibata, M., Kanosue, K.

Neuroscience Letter 331(1) p.17 - 202002-

DOI

Thermal regulation and comfort during a mild-cold exposure in young Japanese women complaining of unusual coldness "jointly worked"

Nagashima, K., Yoda, T., Yagishita, T., Taniguchi, A., Hosono, T., Kanosue, K.

Journal of Applied Physiology 92(3) p.1029 - 10352002-

温熱的快・不快感(暑さ・寒さ)とは(共著)

彼末 一之 , 永島 計 , 谷口 あき , 小西 正博

繊維製品消費科学 43(3) p.17 - 222002-

Hypothalamic region facilitating shivering in rats "jointly worked"

Tanaka, M., Tonouchi, M., Hosono, T., Nagashima, K., Yanase-Fujiwara, M., Kanosue, K.

Japanese Journal of Physiology 51(5) p.625 - 6292001-

DOI

Increased heat-escape/cold-seeking behavior following hypertonic saline injection in rats "jointly worked"

Nagashima, K., Wu, J., Kavouras, S.A., Mack, G.W.

American Journal of Physiology 280p.R1031 - R10362001-

Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption during exercise-induced hypervolemia in humans "jointly worked"

Nagashima, K., Wu, J., Kavouras, S.A., Mack, G.W.

Journal of Applied Physiology 91(3) p.1229 - 12362001-

Neuronal organizations for thermoregulation "jointly worked"

Nagashima, K., Nakai, S., Tanaka, M., Kanosue, K.

Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical 85p.18 - 252000-

DOI

温熱的快・不快感(暑さ・寒さ)の脳内機序(共著)

Biomedical Thermology 21p.38 - 442001-

視床下部と体温調節(共著)

Clinical Neuroscience 19p.47 - 492001-

Human cardiovascular and humoral responses to moderate muscle activation during dynamic exercise "jointly worked"

Journal of Applied Physiology 88p.300 - 3072000-

Intense exercise stimulates albumin synthesis in the upright posture "jointly worked"

Journal of Applied Physiology 88p.41 - 462000-

Neuronal organizations for thermoregulation "jointly worked"

Autonomic Neuroscience 85p.18 - 252000-

温熱的情動感覚(暑さ・寒さ)の脳機構(共著)

生活の場における温度・湿度と人間 講演論文集 p.33 - 362000-

1998 International Symposium on Human Biometeorology

IPEC p.80 - 851999-

Attenuation of urinary sodium excretion during cold-air exposure in trained athletes "jointly worked"

Japanese Journal of Physiology 49p.193 - 1991999-

Mechanism for the posture-specific plasma volume increase after a single intense exercise protocol "jointly worked"

Journal of Applied Physiology 86p.867 - 8731999-

Erythropoietin投与下の造血能の検討(共著)

京都府立医科大学雑誌 108p.439 - 4451999-

アメニティーを感ずる-温熱的快・不快感の脳内機序-(共著)

日本熱物性学会創立20周年記念セミナー講演集 p.11 - 181999-

地球温暖化とヒト

建築雑誌 114p.30 - 331999-

年齢、体重がエリスロポイエチン(rHuEPO)投与下の造血能に及ぼす影響(共著)

京都府立医科大学雑誌 108p.555 - 5641999-

Cardiac filling and lactate concentration in plasma during exercise in a hot environment "jointly worked"

The 1997 Nagano Symposium on Sports Sciences p.231 - 2341998-

Cardiac filling and lactate concentration in plasma during exercise in a hot environment "jointly worked"

ibid Section 6 40p.306 - 3161998-

Cardiac filling and lactate threshold during graded exercise "jointly worked"

The 5th Annu al Pacific Rim Conference on Exercise Science and Sports Medicine; Exercise and the Human Body p.209 - 2191998-

Effect of continuous negative-pressure breathing on skin blood flow during exercise in a hot environment "jointly worked"

Journal of Applied Physiology 84p.1845 - 18511998-

Effects of posture on cardiovascular responses to lower body positive pressure at rest and during dynamic exercise "jointly worked"

Journal of Applied Physiology 85p.160 - 1671998-

Influence of hydrostatic pressure gradients on regulation of plasma volume after exercise "jointly worked"

Journal of Applied Physiology 85p.667 - 6751998-

Nonshivering thermoregulatory responses in trained athletes: effect of physical fitness and body fat. "jointly worked"

Japanese Journal of Physiology 48p.143 - 1481998-

Role of plasma osmolality in the delayed onset of thermal cutaneous vasodilation during exercise in humans "jointly worked"

American Journal of Physiology 275p.R286 - R2901998-

Role of plasma osmolality in the exercise-induced inhibition of cutaneous vasodilation "jointly worked"

ibid Section 6 p.344 - 3481998-

The role of albumin in the hypervolemia of exercise "jointly worked"

The 1997 Nagano Symposium on Sports Science p.375 - 3841998-

Effect of hydration level on thermoregulatory responses during exercise in rats "jointly worked"

Thermal Physiology 1997 p.103 - 1061997-

Negative pressure breathing and the control of skin blood flow during exercise in a hot environment "jointly worked"

Thermoregulation p.604 - 6091997-

Osmoregulatory inhibition of thermally induced cutaneous vasodilation in passively heated humans "jointly worked"

American Journal of Physiology 273p.R197 - R2041997-

Osmotic inhibition of thermally induced cutaneous vasodilation in humans and its role in the inhibition of cutaneous vasodilation during exercise "jointly worked"

Thermal Physiology 1997 p.99 - 1021997-

Relationship between aerobic power, blood volume, and thermoregulatory responses to exercise-heat stress "jointly worked"

Medine and Science in Sports and Exercise 29p.867 - 8731997-

Transcapillary escape rate of albumin in humans during exercise induced hypervolemia "jointly worked"

Journal of Applied Physiology 83p.407 - 4131997-

Cardiovascular response to exercise in a hot environment "jointly worked"

Progress in Biometeology 11p.13 - 221996-

Relationship between atrial natriuretic peptide and plasma volume during graded exercise with water immersion "jointly worked"

Journal of Applied Physiology 78p.217 - 2241995-

The effects of a-adrenergic activation on the shift of electrolytes and fluid after hemorrhage in rats "jointly worked"

Japanese Journal of Physiology 45p.381 - 3951995-

左心室の弾性測定における容積変化率依存性(共著)

循環器科 37p.524 - 5271995-

ERYTHROPOIETIN投与下の骨髄の検討(共著)

自己血輸血 5p.78 - 821992-

術前貯血法へのエリスロポイエチンの応用と問題点-合併症ならびに年齢体重からみた投与基準の検討(共著)

自己血輸血 6p.152 - 1571992-

Successful correction of a Collet Edwards Type II Truncus Arteriosus after Bilateral Pulmonary artery Banding

Japanese Journal of Surgery 19p.751 - 7551989-

高齢者胃癌患者の術前、術後の合併症について(共著)

交通医学 43p.160 - 1631989-

転移性肝癌に対する肝切除の検討(共著)

交通医学 43p.165 - 1711989-

Infiltrating ductal carcinoma developing within Cystosarcoma Phyllodes “jointly worked”

Japanese Journal of Surgery 18p.326 - 3291988-

術後癌性腹膜炎に対するCDDP,OK-432の腹腔内同時投与の治療効果(共著)

交通医学 42p.298 - 3011988-

The effect of estrogen on biological rhythms in female rats

JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 63p.S158 - S1582013-2013

WoS

Detail

ISSN:1880-6546

Cold exposure and/or fasting modulate the relationship between sleep and body temperature rhythms in mice

Physiology and Behavior 149p.69 - 752015/10-2015/10

DOIScopus

Detail

ISSN:00319384

Outline:© 2015 Elsevier Inc. We assessed the relationship between core temperature (Tc) and sleep rhythms in mice, and examined the effects of ambient temperature and fasting. Tc, electroencephalograms (EEG), electromyograms (EMG), and spontaneous activity in male ICR mice (n=9) were measured by telemetry for 3days under a 12:12h dark-light cycle. Mice were fed or fasted at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 27°C or 20°C for the final 30h of the experiment. The vigilance state was categorized into a wake state, rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep, and the total sleep time (TST) was assessed. Relationships between Tc and TST, NREM periods, and REM sleep were estimated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. During cold exposure, Tc decreased during the dark and light phases, and TST and the periods of NREM and REM sleep decreased during the dark phase. Throughout the fasting period, Tc also decreased during the dark and light phases. Furthermore, the decrease in Tc was augmented when fasting and cold were combined. TST and NREM sleep periods decreased in the light and dark phases, respectively, whereas REM sleep periods decreased in both phases. Negative linear correlations (r=-0.884 to -0.987) were observed between Tc and TST, NREM sleep periods, and REM sleep periods, except for Tc and REM sleep periods where fasting and cold conditions were combined. The correlations between sleep and Tc rhythms were well maintained during cold exposure and fasting. However, when cold and fasting were combined, REM sleep and Tc rhythms were desynchronized.

The effect of feeding condition and ambient temperature to sleep-wake pattern

Nobuo, Sato;Matsuda, Mayumi;Marui, Shuri;Ozaki, Makoto;Nagashima, Kei

JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 63p.S256 - S2562013-2013

Detail

ISSN:1880-6546

Protection of the brain against heat damage

Matsuda-Nakamura Mayumi;Nagashima Kei

JPFSM 3(2) p.217 - 2212014-2014

CiNii

Detail

ISSN:2186-8131

Outline:In homeothermic animals, metabolic heat production in the brain is higher than in other tissues. However, cerebral tissue is susceptible to heat. Several animals have mechanisms that selectively cool the brain during hyperthermia (i.e., selective brain cooling [SBC]). Carotid retes have been well documented in artiodactyls (hoofed animals) and felids (cats) as mechanisms of SBC. SBC has also been found in some species without carotid retes, such as horses and squirrel monkeys. However, the presence of SBC in humans remains controversial. Brain temperature cannot be directly measured in healthy subjects; therefore, tympanic temperature has been used to estimate brain temperature. However, tympanic temperature is reportedly affected by facial skin temperature. We recently investigated the effect of facial fanning on tympanic and esophageal temperature in normothermic and hyperthermic humans. The results showed that tympanic temperature is not affected by the facial skin temperature under normothermic conditions and that facial fanning may induce SBC under hyperthermic conditions. Regional differences in thermal comfort are present over the body surface in humans, i.e. humans prefer a cool head in the heat and a warm abdomen in the cold. Therefore, preference for a low facial temperature may activate SBC. Several recent studies have demonstrated that whole-brain temperature can be measured noninvasively with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The existence of a thermal gradient within the brain has been suggested. Studies measuring whole-brain temperature will reveal the details of human SBC.

Tail position affects the body temperature of rats during cold exposure in a low-energy state.

Uchida Yuki;Tokizawa Ken;Nakamura Mayumi;Lin Cheng-Hsien;Nagashima Kei

Tail position affects the body temperature of rats during cold exposure in a low-energy state. 198(2) 2012-2012

PubMedDOI

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ISSN:1432-1351

Outline::Rats place their tails underneath their body trunks when cold (tail-hiding behavior). The aim of the present study was to determine whether this behavior is necessary to maintain body temperature. Male Wistar rats were divided into 'fed' and '42-h fasting' groups. A one-piece tail holder (8.4 cm in length) that prevented the tail-hiding behavior or a three-piece tail holder (2.8 cm in length) that allowed for the tail-hiding behavior was attached to the tails of the rats. The rats were exposed to 27°C for 180 min or to 20°C for 90 min followed by 15°C for 90 min with continuous body temperature and oxygen consumption measurements. Body temperature decreased by -1.0 ± 0.1°C at 15°C only in the rats that prevented tail-hiding behavior of the 42-h fasting group, and oxygen consumption increased at 15°C in all animals. Oxygen consumption was not different between the rats that prevented tail-hiding behavior and the rats that allowed the behavior in the fed and 42-h fasting groups under ambient conditions. These results show that the tail-hiding behavior is involved in thermoregulation in the cold in fasting rats.

Brain signal recognition and conversion towards symbiosis with ambulatory humanoids

Matsuyama, Yasuo; Noguchi, Keita; Hatakeyama, Takashi; Ochiai, Nimiko; Hori, Tatsuro

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) 6334 LNAIp.101 - 1112010/11-2010/11

DOI

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ISSN:03029743

Outline:Human-humanoid symbiosis by using brain signals is presented. Humans issue two types of brain signals. One is non-invasive NIRS giving oxygenated hemoglobin concentration change and tissue oxygeneration index. The other is a set of neural spike trains (measured on macaques for safety compliance). In addition to such brain signals, human motions are combined so that rich in carbo information is provided for the operation of a humanoid which is a representative of in silico information processing appliances. The total system contains a recognition engine of an HMM/SVM-embedded Bayesian network so that the in carbo signals are integrated, recognized and converted to operate the humanoid. This well-folded system has made it possible to operate the humanoid by thinking alone using a conventional PC. The designed system's ability of transducing sensory information is expected to lead to amusement systems, rehabilitation and prostheses. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

Estrogenic modulation of female thermoregulatory behavior in a cold environment

Uchida Yuki;Nagashima Kei;Marui Shuri

The Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine 5(1) p.77 - 802016-2016

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ISSN:2186-8131

Outline:Thermoregulation is categorized as either autonomic (i.e., sweating, shivering) or behavioral (i.e., wearing clothes, usage of air conditioner) thermoregulation. Compared to autonomic thermoregulation, the neural pathway of behavioral thermoregulation in cold environments remains unclear. A decrease in ambient temperature is perceived through thermoreceptors for detecting cold, including transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, such as TRPM8 and TRPA1, which are expressed in the sensory nerve endings of the skin. From these receptors, nerves connect to the dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn in the spinal cord, and arrive at the lateral parabrachial nucleus in the pons, which is the same neural pathway that is used for autonomic thermoregulation. Following this, an unknown neural pathway induces thermoregulatory behavior, such as cold-escape behavior. Both young and climacteric women complain of an unpleasant thermal comfort, which is attributed to "hie-sho" (chill or poor blood circulation). The altered thermal sensation and comfort by an absence or a fluctuation of estrogen (E2) may modulate behavioral thermoregulation in females. This effect is unknown in women. However, in ovariectomized rats, E2 facilitated thermoregulatory behavior in the cold, as evaluated by an operant system and tail-hiding behavior, a possible new behavioral indicator that we reported. E2 decreased neural activity in the insular cortex, as assessed by cFos immunohistochemistry, while tail-hiding behavior increased in colder temperatures. We speculate that the suppression of neural activity in the insular cortex by E2 may be related to behavioral thermoregulation in a cold environment. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the effects of E2 on TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels, and the neural pathway of behavioral thermoregulation.

Influence of osmotic stress on thermal perception and thermoregulation in heat is different between sedentary and trained men.

Tokizawa Ken;Matsuda-Nakamura Mayumi;Tanaka Yuki;Uchida Yuki;Lin Cheng-Hsien;Nagashima Kei

Physiology & behavior 161p.66 - 732016-2016

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ISSN:1873-507X

Outline::Hyperosmolality in extracellular fluid in humans attenuates autonomic thermoregulation in heat, such as sweating and blood flow in the skin. However, exercise training minimizes the attenuation. The aim of the present study was to clarify the influence of hyperosmolality on thermal perception and to assess the training effect of exercise. Ten sedentary (SED) and 10 endurance-trained (TR) healthy young men were infused with 0.9% (normal saline [NS]) or 3% NaCl (hypertonic saline [HS]) for 120min on two separate days. After infusion for 20min, heat stimulus to the skin of the whole body was produced by a gradual increase in hot water-perfused suit temperature (33°C, 36°C, and 39°C), which was first used in the normothermic condition and then in the mild hyperthermic condition (0.5-0.6°C increase in esophageal temperature) and controlled by immersion of the lower legs in a water bath at 34.5°C and 42°C, respectively. Thermal sensation and comfort were rated at the time of each thermal condition. Plasma osmolality increased by ~10mosmL/kg·H2O in the HS trial. In the mild hyperthermic condition, increases in sweat rate and cutaneous vascular conductance were lower in the HS than in the NS trial in both the SED and TR groups (p<0.05). In the SED group, thermal sensation in the mild hyperthermic condition was lower in the HS than in the NS trial (p<0.05); there was no significant difference between the trials in the TR group. These results might indicate that hyperosmolality attenuates thermal sensation with heat and that exercise training eliminates the attenuation.

Systemic estradiol administration to ovariectomized rats facilitates thermoregulatory behavior in a cold environment

Uchida, Yuki; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Yuri, Kazunari

Brain Research 1670p.125 - 1342017/09-2017/09

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ISSN:00068993

Outline:© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Rats place their tails underneath their bodies in the cold (tail-hiding behavior), which is a behavioral indicator of thermoregulation. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of estradiol (E 2 ) on tail-hiding behavior and neural activity assessed by immunohistochemistry. Ovariectomized rats were implanted with a silastic tube with or without E 2 underneath the dorsal skin (E 2 (−) and E 2 (+) groups), and exposed to 27 °C, 16 °C, and 10 °C for 2 h with continuous body temperature (T b ), tail skin temperature (T tail ), and behavioral measurements. cFos immunoreactive (cFos-IR) cells in the insula, secondary somatosensory cortex, medial preoptic nucleus, parastrial nucleus, amygdala, and lateral parabrachial nucleus were counted. T b and T tail were not different between the E 2 (−) and E 2 (+) groups. At 16 °C, the duration and the onset of tail-hiding behavior in the E 2 (+) group were greater than that in the E 2 (−) group. The number of cFos-IR cells in the insula of the E 2 (−) group was greater than that of the E 2 (+) group in rats kept at 16 °C. E 2 might modulate tail-hiding behavior of female rats at 16 °C, and the insula may be involved in the response.

Assessment of axillary temperature for the evaluation of normal body temperature of healthy young adults at rest in a thermoneutral environment

Marui, Shuri; Misawa, Ayaka; Tanaka, Yuki; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei

Journal of physiological anthropology 36(1) 2017/02-2017/02

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Outline:CONCLUSIONS: Modern devices for measuring axillary temperature may have changed the range of body temperature that is recognized as normal. Core body temperature variations estimated by tympanic measurements were smaller than those estimated by axillary measurements. This variation of axillary temperature may be due to changes in the measurement methods introduced by modern devices and techniques. However, axillary temperature values correlated well with those of tympanic measurements, suggesting that the technique may reliably report an individual's state of health. It is important for individuals to know their baseline axillary temperature to evaluate subsequent temperature measurements as normal or abnormal. Moreover, axillary temperature variations may, in part, reflect fat mass and changes due to the menstrual cycle. BACKGROUND: The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate whether recently introduced methods of measuring axillary temperature are reliable, (2) examine if individuals know their baseline body temperature based on an actual measurement, and (3) assess the factors affecting axillary temperature and reevaluate the meaning of the axillary temperature. METHODS: Subjects were healthy young men and women (n = 76 and n = 65, respectively). Three measurements were obtained: (1) axillary temperature using a digital thermometer in a predictive mode requiring 10 s (T ax-10 s), (2) axillary temperature using a digital thermometer in a standard mode requiring 10 min (T ax-10 min), and (3) tympanic membrane temperature continuously measured by infrared thermometry (T ty). The subjects answered questions about eating and exercise habits, sleep and menstrual cycles, and thermoregulation and reported what they believed their regular body temperature to be (T reg). RESULTS: T reg, T ax-10 s, T ax-10 min, and T ty were 36.2 ± 0.4, 36.4 ± 0.5, 36.5 ± 0.4, and 36.8 ± 0.3 °C (mean ± SD), respectively. There were correlations between T ty and T ax-10 min, T ty and T ax-10 s, and T ax-10 min and T ax-10 s (r = .62, r = .46, and r = .59, respectively, P  <  .001), but not between T reg and T ax-10 s (r = .11, P = .20). A lower T ax-10 s was associated with smaller body mass indices and irregular menstrual cycles.

Mechanisms of heat acclimation and tolerance induced by exercise training and heat exposure

TOKIZAWA Ken;LIN Cheng-Hsien;NAGASHIMA Kei

JPFSM 1(2) p.343 - 3462012/07-2012/07

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ISSN:21868131

Outline:Most animals can adapt physiologically and biochemically when exposed to altered temperatures for prolonged periods. In humans, marked physiological adjustments are apparent following repeated bouts of core temperature elevation, either from exercise, or high ambient environmental temperatures, or both. In this review, the mechanisms for such adjustments, called "heat acclimation", are discussed. First, the authors focus on thermoregulatory responses in the process of heat acclimation, i.e. how thermoregulation adapts to changes in temperature following repeated exposure to heat and exercise. Once heat acclimation is achieved, skin vasodilation and sweating are initiated at a lower core temperature threshold, and higher sweat rates can be sustained. Second, knowledge regarding the central and peripheral mechanisms for heat acclimation and tolerance is discussed. Recently, two advances - the implication that long-term accommodation to a changing environment involves functional neuronal remodeling associated with transcriptional reprogramming, and the understanding that there is neurogenesis in the hypothalamus - have introduced new concepts to the study of heat acclimation. Although it is still a developing issue, future study will bridge the gap between the classical physiological heat acclimation profile and molecular and cellular mechanisms.

Thermoregulation and menstrual cycle.

Nagashima Kei

Temperature (Austin, Tex.) 2(3)

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ISSN:2332-8940

Effects of alcohol on autonomic responses and thermal sensation during cold exposure in humans

Yoda, Tamae; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Saito, Kumiko; Nakamura, Mayumi; Nakamura, Mayumi; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

Alcohol 42(3) p.207 - 2122008/05-2008/05

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ISSN:07418329

Outline:We investigated the effects of alcohol on thermoregulatory responses and thermal sensations during cold exposure in humans. Eight healthy men (mean age 22.3 ± 0.7 year) participated in this study. Experiments were conducted twice for each subject at a room temperature of 18°C. After a 30-min resting period, the subject drank either 15% alcohol at a dose of 0.36 g/kg body weight (alcohol session) or an equal volume of distilled water (control session), and remained in a sitting position for another 60 min. Mean skin temperature continued to decrease and was similar in control and alcohol sessions. Metabolic rate was lower in the alcohol session, but the difference did not affect core temperature, which decreased in a similar manner in both alcohol and control sessions (from 36.9 ± 0.1°C to 36.6 ± 0.1°C). Whole body sensations of cold and thermal discomfort became successively stronger in the control session, whereas these sensations were both greatly diminished after drinking alcohol. In a previous study we performed in the heat, using a similar protocol, alcohol produced a definite, coordinated effect on all autonomic and sentient heat loss effectors. In the current study in the cold, as compared to responses in the heat, alcohol intake was followed by lesser alterations in autonomic effector responses, but increased changes in sensations of temperature and thermal discomfort. Overall, our results indicate that although alcohol influences thermoregulation in the cold as well as in the heat, detailed aspects of the influence are quite different. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Regional Differences in Temperature Sensation and Thermal Comfort in Humans

CRAWSHAW Larry I.

46(3) 2009/09-2009/09

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ISSN:03891313

Effects of warming the lower back with a heat and steam generating sheet on thermoregulatory responses and sensation

ODA Hideshi;IGAKI Michihito;UGAJIN Toru;SUZUKI Atsushi;TSUCHIYA Shuichi;NAGASHIMA Kei;ISO Shigeo;KANOSUE Kazuyuki

Japanese journal of biometeorology 43(1) p.43 - 502006/05-2006/05

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ISSN:03891313

4A-2 The effects of color light on the human thermoregulation and mood under the condition of cold water load(Special Issue 40th Annual Meeting)

Kaku You;Saito Miho;Oza Keiichi;Tokizawa Ken;Nagashima Kei

Journal of the color science association of Japan 33(0) p.46 - 472009-2009

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ISSN:03899357

Thermoregulation in humans : What is regulated and why?

Kanosue Kazuyuki;Crawshaw Larry;Yoda Tamae;Nakamura Mayumi;Nagashima Kei

Proceedings of the ... Symposium on Human-Environment System 20112011/10-2011/10

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A New System for the Analysis of Thermal Judgments: Multipoint Measurements of Skin Temperatures and Temperature-Related Sensations and Their Joint Visualization

Nakamura Mayumi;Esaki Hidenori;Yoda Tamae;Yasuhara Saki;Kobayashi Akiko;Konishi Aki;Osawa Naoki;Nagashima Kei;Crawshaw Larry I.;Kanosue Kazuyuki

The Japanese Journal of Physiology 56(6) p.459 - 4642006-2006

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ISSN:1880-6546

Outline:We report a new system for monitoring sensations of many body parts as well as comprehensively showing the distribution of overall skin temperature (Tsk) and temperature-related sensations. The system consists of a console with 52 levers to report temperature-related sensations and software that facilitates the visualization of the distribution of Tsk and temperature-related sensations by displaying them on a model of the human body. The system's utility was demonstrated with a physiological experiment involving three males and three females. They were exposed to step changes of ambient temperature from 23°C to 33°C. We measured Tsk at 50 points, and the subjects concurrently provided estimates of local temperature sensation and thermal comfort/discomfort at 25 loci. This system greatly facilitates the perception and analysis of spatial relationships and differences in temperature and sensation in various areas of the body.

Central Mechanisms for Thermoregulation in a Hot Environment

NAGASHIMA Kei

INDUSTRIAL HEALTH 44(3) p.359 - 3672006-2006

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Outline:Homeothermic animals regulate body temperature by autonomic and behavioral thermoeffector responses. The regulation is conducted mainly in the brain. Especially, the preoptic area (PO) in the hypothalamus plays a key role. The PO has abundant warm-sensitive neurons, sending excitatory signals to the brain regions involved in heat loss mechanisms, and inhibitory signals to those involved in heat production mechanisms. The sympathetic fibers determine tail blood flow in rats, which is an effective heat loss process. Some areas in the midbrain and medulla are involved in the control of tail blood flow. Recent study also showed that the hypothalamus is involved in heat escape behavior in rats. However, our knowledge about behavioral regulation is limited. The central mechanism for thermal comfort and discomfort, which induce various behavioral responses, should be clarified. In the heat, dehydration affects both autonomic and behavioral thermoregulation by non-thermoregulatory factors such as high Na+ concentration. The PO seems to be closely involved in these responses. The knowledge about the central mechanisms involved in thermoregulation is important to improve industrial health, e.g. preventing accidents associated with the heat or organizing more comfortable working environment.

Sex difference in thermoregulation-impact of estrogen on thermoregulation-

Nagashima Kei;Konishi Masahiro;Kobayashi Akiko;Kano Masumi

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2006(0) p.102 - 1022006-2006

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Outline:Body temperature (Tb) is different between male and female, e.g. daily change in Tb is fluctuated with menstruation cycle in female rats. We hypothesized that estrogen plays a crucial role in the sex difference in Tb. Methods (1) Daily change of Tb was measured after gonadectomy in male and female rats. After the measurement, silicon tubes containing 17-beta estradiol (E2) crystalline, aimed to maintain blood estrogen constant, were subcutaneously placed in the rats. Then Tb measurement was repeated. (2) Thermoregulation during 2-h heat exposure at 34°C or cold exposure at 5°C was assessed in gonadectomized female rats, and the same protocol was conducted in those with E2 tubes. Results (1) Compared with male rats, Tb rhythm in female gonadectomized rats became unstable, showing 2-4 h irregular oscillations. Tb rhythm remained unchanged in male gonadectomized rats. In female gonadectomized rats with E2 tubes, Tb rhythm returned to the normal level. However, there was no influence of E2 on Tb rhythm in the male rats. (2) Both in the heat and cold, gonadectomized female rats could not maintain their Tb as those with E2 tubes. Histological analysis for the rat brain showed that Fos-immunoreactive cells in the hypothalamus were smaller in the rats without E2 tubes. Conclusion These results show that estrogen is involved in the thermoregulation in female rats. Estrogen may modulate thermal sensitivity to the environment at the level of the hypothalamus [J Physiol Sci. 2006;56 Suppl:S102]

A new simple apparatus for the study of rodent behavioral thermoregulation using a principle of alternative selection of ambient temperatures

Takayoshi Hosono;Kanosue Kazuyuki;Nagashima Kei

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2006(0) p.227 - 2272006-2006

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Outline:Recent instruments for the study of thermoregulation in rodents are usually large and often require troublesome trainings of animals. In this study, we designed, made and tested a new simple instrument for investigating rodents' behavioral thermoregulation. The apparatus was composed of two stainless-steel hollow plates (plate A and plate B) with a length of 20cm and width of 5cm. Each plate had an inlet and an outlet that were connected to a separate constant-temperature bath (bath 1 and bath 2). The water temperatures of the baths were controlled at one designated temperature within 10 and 45 degrees and pumped into the plates. A change switch for the water supply was inserted between both the plates and the baths. In the normal switch position, bath 1 supplied water plate A, and bath 2 supplied water plate 2, and in the reverse position, vice versa. Plates A and B were arranged and covered with a surrounding transparent fence 20cm high in a climatic chamber. A rodent stayed inside the fence and moved on plate A or plate B. The position of the rodent was observed by a video camera. We tested thermoregulatory behavior of eight male mice using this instrument. By shuffling the plate temperatures between 10 and 45 degree, the mice moved to the plates with a temperature close to the 35 degree. The findings implied our instrument might be useful as an apparatus for the study of behavioral thermoregulation. [J Physiol Sci. 2006;56 Suppl:S227]

Influence of feeding on thermoregulation

Nagashima Kei

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2007(0) p.32 - 322007-2007

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Outline:Introduction Body temperature is finely regulated, although feeding condition is a factor modulating the regulation. Fasting is a strong stimulus reducing metabolism (i.e. heat production). However, body temperature is well maintained in the active phase, indicating change in thermoregulation. I discuss about neural and hormonal mechanisms involved in the change in thermal regulation during fasting and the possible role of clock genes. Experiments and Results 1) Fasting induced greater reduction of metabolism and its circadian amplitude. Although the reduction of heat production, body temperature rhythm was well maintained except for greater decrease of body temperature around the lights onset. During the fasting, body surface temperature was greatly reduced, meaning that heat loss mechanisms were suppressed. 2) During fasting, heat producing response to the cold was attenuated in rats. However, this response is attenuated in the presence of i.c.v. leptin. 3) Feed-fast cycle generated daily oscillation of body temperature in clock mutant and cry knockout mice, both mice could not modulate heat loss responses to the fasting. 4) Fasting affects neural activities in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, estimated by c-Fos expression. Conclusion Fasting is a strong signal modulating thermal regulation. Leptin level in the central may be a factor to change metabolic activity, deactivating the sympathetic nerves to the brown adipose tissue. Moreover, circadian clock receive fasting signals, which may alter heat loss responses and maintain body temperature rhythm. [J Physiol Sci. 2007;57 Suppl:S32]

The regional difference in temperature sensation and thermal comfort/discomfort in human

Nakamura Mayumi;Yoda Tamae;Yasuhara Saki;Saito Yasuyo;Nagashima Kei;Crawshaw Larry I..;Kanosue Kazuyuki

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2007(0) p.184 - 1842007-2007

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Outline:We examined the regional difference in temperature sensation and thermal comfort/discomfort. Subjects sitting in a 32-33°C environment were locally cooled and warmed with water perfused stimulators. The areas stimulated were the face, chest, abdmen and thigh. The temperature of water for cooling was 25°C, and that for warming was 42°C. The area of stimulation was 270 cm2 and each stimulation lasted 1.5 min. Temperature sensation and thermal comfort/discomfort of stimulated area and those of whole body were reported by the subjects using dials numbered from -10 to 10 (0 : neutral). The setting of the dial procedured a voltage which was continuously recorded. At the basal condition without local stimulation subjects reported hot and uncomfortable for whole body sensation. During local thermal stimulation there is no significant difference in local temperature sensation among the four areas. But for thermal comfort/discomfort, face and abdmen displayed characteristic sensation for cold stimulation. Thermal comfort was strongest for the face by cooling. On the other hand, abdominal cooling produced discomfort even in the hot environment. These results suggest that there is regional difference in the production of thermal comfort/discomfort. [J Physiol Sci. 2007;57 Suppl:S184]

Menstrual cycle affects thermal regulation and comfort

Yasuhara Saki;Iwama Aine;Kanou Masumi;Nakamura Mayumi;Nagashima Kei

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2007(0) p.183 - 1832007-2007

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Outline:INTRODUCTION It is well known that body temperature in female is closely linked with menstrual cycle. We reported that estrogen affects thermal regulation in rats: 1) estrogen is involved in circadian body temperature rhythm; 2) estrogen has an important role in thermal regulation in both the heat and cold. Moreover, in human beings, not a small population of females experiences some troubles in thermoregulation such as hot flash or cold sensation. Estrogen replacement therapy is sometimes effective for the females. In this study, we hypothesized that there would be differences in thermoregulation and thermal sensation, depending of menstruation cycle. METHOSDS and RESULTS Eight female subjects with a regular menstruation participated in this study. Experiments were conducted twice for each subject in follicular (F) and luteal (L) phases, determined by basal body temperature. Experimental condition was 120-min exposure at 23.5°C after a 40-min baseline at 29.5°C. Mean skin temperature decreased and body core temperature increased in both F and L during the 23.5°C exposure. Oxygen consumption also increased in F and L. Based on rating scores for thermal sensation and comfort, L enhanced both coldness and unpleasantness when ambient temperature changed from 29.5°C to 23.5°C. COMCLUSION Although the autonomic thermal regulation seems to be similar between F and L, the menstrual phase may have an influence on thermal sensation or comfort. Estrogen may be involved in this mechanism. [J Physiol Sci. 2007;57 Suppl:S183]

Estrus cycle modulates thermoregulatory responses to the cold in rats

Nagashima Kei;Kano Masumi;Uchida Yuki;Tokizawa Ken

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2008(0) p.60 - 602008-2008

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Outline:Introduction We have reported that estrogen has influence on thermoregulation in the heat and cold. In ovariectomized rats, in the heat, an increase in body temperature (Tb) was greater with a reduction in heat dissipation from the skin. In the cold, Tb was smaller with a decrease in metabolic heat production. However, 17β-estradiol (E2) replacement restores these responses to normal levels. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the estrogen fluctuation in normal estrus cycle would modulate the thermoregulary response to the cold in rats. Methods Female WKY rats were laparectomized and radiotelemeters for Tb were placed. At least 2 wks after the surgery, rats' vaginal smear was obtained to determine the estrus cycle. At 9 am, rats in proestrus or diestrus period were exposed to 5°C or 25°C environment for 2 h, and Tb was monitored. After the cold exposure, rats were perfused with phosphate buffered saline and the brains were excised. cFos immunoreactive cells in the hypothalamic area were counted. Results Tb increased in the cold in the proestrus period, but decreased in the diestrus period. Plasma E2 was higher in the proestrus period than estrus period with a small difference in progesterone level. cFos immunoreactive cells in the medial preoptic area and dorsomedial hypothalamus were greater in the proestrus period. Conclusion Thermoregulation in the cold differs among the periods of estrus cycle in rats. The fluctuation of plasma E2 level may be involved in the mechanism. [J Physiol Sci. 2008;58 Suppl:S60]

Effect of hypothalamic application of 17-βestradiol on thermoregulation during a cold exposure in female rats

Uchida Yuki;Tokizawa Ken;Nagashima Kei

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2008(0) p.100 - 1002008-2008

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Outline:INTRODUCTION We reported that, in ovariectomized rats, thermoregulation in the cold was attenuated. Systemic administration of 17-βestradiol (E2) restored the attenuated response. E2 increased cFOS immunoreactive cells in the medial preoptic area ( MPO ) and dorsomedial hypothalamus ( DMH ) in the cold. In the present study, we hypothesized that E2 would upregulate thermosensitivity to the cold at the level of the hypothalamus. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effect of the local administration of E2 to the two hypothalamic areas on body temperature ( Tb ) in the cold. METHODS Adult female rats were ovariectomized, and a stainless steel canula was placed in the MPO, DMH, or horizontal limb diagonal band. At least 7 days after the surgery, E2 or cholesterol was administrated to this brain area through the canula. Forty-eight hours after the administration, a rat was exposed to 10°C or 25°C environment for 2h, and Tb was continuously measured. RESULTS During the 10°C exposure, Tb increased only in the group, which is administrated E2 in the MPO. Either cholesterol nor E2 in the other brain area had no effect on Tb. CONCLUSION The MPO has abundant estrogen receptors and so-called thermosensitive neurons, estrogen may modulate thermosensitivity to the cold in the MPO. We also clarified the mechanism, based on cFOS immunoreactivity in the hypothalamic areas and UCP1 mRNA expression in the interscapular brown adipose tissue. [J Physiol Sci. 2008;58 Suppl:S100]

Difference in thermoregulation between dark and light phase of fasted mice

Tokizawa Ken;Uchida Yuki;Nagashima kei

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2008(0) p.87 - 872008-2008

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Outline:We have shown that circadian body temperature (Tb) rhythm is finely regulated, but feeding condition affects largely the Tb rhythm. During fasting, Tb gradually decreases in the light (inactive) phase, whereas Tb in the dark (active) phase is maintained at the free-feeding level. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism involved in the altered thermoregulation between dark and light phase during fasting. Male ICR mice (2-3 mo old) were housed at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 27°C in a 12:12-h light-dark cycle. After 48-h fasting, cold exposure (Ta=20°C) was carried out at light phase (ZT1-4) or dark phase (ZT13-16). Tb (biotelemetry) and oxygen consumption (VO2, indirect calorimetry) were measured. c-Fos immunostaining was also performed after the cold exposure. During the cold exposure with fasting, Tb decreased by 5.5 ± 2.0°C at light phase, and VO2 remained unchanged. In contrast, at dark phase, Tb decreased by only 2.0 ± 0.5°C with an increase in VO2 (p<0.05), which was greater than that in the light phase (p<0.05). The number of c-Fos-immunoreactive cells after the cold exposure with fasting were greater at the dark phase than the light phase in the medial preoptic area, dorsomedial hypothalamus, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and arcuate nucleus. These results indicate that fasting attenuates thermoregulatory response to the cold, and the response differs among time of the day. The difference between the dark and light phase would be partially due to the neuronal activity in the hypothalamus. [J Physiol Sci. 2008;58 Suppl:S87]

Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from sNN =7.7 to 200 GeV

Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Bathe, S.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belikov, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Bok, J. S.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Butsyk, S.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Campbell, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chai, J. S.

Physical Review C 93(2) 2016/02-2016/02

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ISSN:24699985

Outline:© 2016 American Physical Society. Measurements of midrapidity charged-particle multiplicity distributions, dNch/dη, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, dET/dη, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au+Au collisions at sNN=200, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu+Cu collisions at sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV, Cu+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV, U+U collisions at sNN=193 GeV, d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV, He3+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV, and p+p collisions at sNN=200 GeV. Centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity are presented in terms of the number of nucleon participants, Npart, and the number of constituent quark participants, Nqp. For all A+A collisions down to sNN=7.7 GeV, it is observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with Nqp than scaling with Npart. Also presented are estimates of the Bjorken energy density, BJ, and the ratio of dET/dη to dNch/dη, the latter of which is seen to be constant as a function of centrality for all systems.

The involvement of Cry1 and Cry2 genes in the regulation of the circadian body temperature rhythm in mice

Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Matsue, Kenta; Konishi, Masahiro; Iidaka, Chisato; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Ishida, Norio; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology 288(1 57-1) 2005/01-2005/01

PubMedDOIScopus

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ISSN:03636119

Outline:The criptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2) are involved in the molecular mechanism that controls the circadian clock, and mice lacking these genes (Cry1 -/- /Cry2 -/- ) are behaviorally arrhythmic. It has been speculated that the circadian clock modulates the characteristics of thermoregulation, resulting in body temperature (T b ) rhythm. However, there is no direct evidence proving this speculation. We show here that T b and heat production in Cry1 -/- /Cry2 -/- mice are arrhythmic under constant darkness. In contrast, both rhythms occur under a light-dark cycle and/or periodical food restriction linked with spontaneous activity and/or eating, although they are not robust as those in wild-type mice. The relationship between heat production and T b in Cry1 -/- /Cry2 -/- mice is linear and identical under any conditions, indicating that their T b rhythm is determined by heat production rhythm associated with activity and eating. However, T b in wild-type mice is maintained at a relatively higher level in the active phase than the inactive phase regardless of the heat production level. These results indicate that the thermoregulatory responses are modulated according to the circadian phase, and the Cry genes are involved in this mechanism.

Brain regions expressing Fos during thermoregulatory behavior in rats.

Maruyama Megumi;Nishi Maiko;Konishi Masahiro;Takashige Yuko;Nagashima Kei;Kiyohara Toshikazu;Kanosue Kazuyuki

American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology 285(5) 2003-2003

PubMed

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ISSN:0363-6119

Outline::We surveyed the neural substrata for behavioral thermoregulation with immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of Fos protein in the rat brain. We used an operant system in which a rat exposed to heat (40 degrees C) could get cold air (0 degrees C) for 30 s when it moved into the reward area. Rats moved in and out of the reward area of the system periodically and thus maintained their body temperature at a normal level. In the rats performing heat escape behavior (active group), strong Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) was found in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), parastrial nucleus (PS), and dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) compared with the controls. Another group of rats (passive group) were given the same temperature changes, regardless of the rat's movement, as those obtained by rats of the active group. Fos-IR in the MnPO was also seen in this group. The present results suggest that the PS and DMH play an important role in the genesis of thermoregulatory behavior, whereas the MnPO may be important for detecting changes in ambient and/or body temperatures.

Lesions of the median preoptic nucleus abolish the increase in operant heat-escape/warm-seeking behavior after hypertonic-saline injection

Konishi Masahiro;Asano Kento;Nagashima Kei;Kanosue Kazuyuki

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2004(0) p.S230 - S2302004-2004

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Outline:We previously reported that s.c. hypertonic-saline increased operant heat-escape/warm-seeking behavior in rats. In this study, to assess the mechanism involved, the behavior was measured in rats of which the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) was chemically ablated (ibotenic acid, 5 μg). The lesion was verified success by an attenuation of the drink after i.c.v. injection of angiotensin II. Thirty minutes after s.c. injection of either 2500- or 154-mM saline (1.0 ml/100 g), rats were successively placed at 26, 35 and 40°C for 1 h each. They could trigger 0°C-air for 45s when entered a specific area (i.e. operant behavior). In the sham-operated rats, counts of the operant behavior was greater (p<0.05) in 2500-mM than 154-mM saline during 35 and 40°C-heat. However, in the lesioned-rats, the counts did not differ between the two trials, and were at the same level as those in the sham-operated rats in 154-mM saline trial. These results suggest that the MnPO is involved in the mechanism which activates heat-escape/warm-seeking behavior after hypertonic-saline injection. Howeover, the MnPO is not associated with the behavior in euhydrated condition. [Jpn J Physiol 54 Suppl:S230 (2004)]

Effects of alcohol on body temperature regulation in humans

Yoda Tamae;Crawshaw Larry;Saito Kumiko;Nakamura Mayumi;Konishi Aki;Nagashima Kei;Uchida Sunao;Kanosue Kazuyuki

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2004(0) p.S230 - S2302004-2004

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Outline:It is well known that alcohol elicits decreases in body temperature (Wasielewski and Holloway. 2001). It is generally considered that alcohol directly acts on cutaneous blood vessels to induce vasodilation, that is, to increase heat dissipation. On the contrary, alcohol that freely crosses blood brain barrier, might act on thermoregulatory center itself so that body temperature was regulated at lower level than normal. In this study, to test this possibility we investigated that the effects of alcohol on thermoregulatory responses and thermal sensations in humans. Six healthy male subjects participated in this study. Experiments were conducted twice for each subject at a room temperature of 33°C. After 30 min resting period the subject drank either 15% alcohol (alcohol session) or water (water session) at a volume of 3 ml/kgwt. Skin blood flow and sweat rate of the chest were measured. Deep body temperature was measured with a telemetry. In response to alcohol drinking sweat rate increased and reached the peak at 20 min after drinking. Deep body temperature decreased after the onset of sweating. Subjects reported increased hot sensation which temporary paralleled with change in sweat rate. These results suggest that in addition to the direct peripheral effect alcohol would act on thermoregulatory center so as to lower body temperature. (This study was approved by the ethical committee of Waseda Univ.) [Jpn J Physiol 54 Suppl:S230 (2004)]

Reduction in body temperature during fasting in rats

Nagashima Kei

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2004(0) p.S56 - S562004-2004

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Outline:Kei Nagashima, Dept Physiol, Waseda Univ Sch Human Sci
A reduction in body temperature during fasting in rats
Body temperature (Tb) is determined by the balance between heat production and heat loss. In rats, Tb is linked with heat production during free-feeding. Fasting reduces the production of heat throughout a day; however, Tb is maintained during the dark phase and decreases markedly during the early light phase. The reduction in Tb would protect animals from excessive heat loss, minimizing the temperature difference between the body and environment. Temperature of the tail, reflecting active heat loss, also decreases during the fasting. These results indicate that rats suppress heat loss to maintain Tb. However, the suppression is weaker in the light phase than dark phase, which would be a mechanism involved in the reduction in Tb. Although it still remains unclear if rats control the phase-specific change in thermoregulation, a couple of evidences proving the possibility are presented in this symposium. When the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master clock for circadian rhythm) are lesioned, the reduction in Tb does not occur, although metabolic heat production decreases in the same manner as the sham-operated rats. Moreover, when rats are exposed to constant darkness, the reduction is attenuated and the phase of the reduction is delayed. These results suggest that the reduction of Tb occurs in response to the stimulus originating the SCN. Moreover, the light is an important factor for this response. In summary, the reduction of Tb during low energy storage would be a regulated phenomenon linked with biological rhythm. [Jpn J Physiol 54 Suppl:S56 (2004)]

New system for the analysis of thermal comfort; multi-point mesurement of skin temperatures and sensations,and their visualization.

Nakamura Mayumi;Esaki Hidenori;Osawa Naoki;Kobayashi Akiko;Konishi Aki;Yasuhara Saki;Nagashima Kei;Kanosue Kazuyuki

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2005(0) p.S221 - S2212005-2005

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Outline:The sensation related to temperature is complex in that there are two different kinds of sensation, subjective “thermal comfort” and objective “temperature sensation”, and in that we feel local as well as whole body sensations. And it is not clear how these different sensations are related with each other. To investigate this question we developed a new system to measure the distribution of whole body skin temperature and the two sensations in human. Skin temperatures (Tsk) of in total 50 points on both sides of the body were measured by thermocouples, and local heat flux was also measured at 25 points by heat flux sensors. Core temperature (Tcore) was measured by telemetric system (CoreTemp), the transmitter of which was swallowed by a subject. Temperature sensation (cold-neutral-hot) and thermal comfort (uncomfortable-neutral-comfortable) of 25 points of body surface, and those of the whole body were reported by the subject using a console with 52 dials for each sensation. Color-coded Tsk and sensations were displayed on the computer display. This system enables to see the distribution and change of Tsk and sensations over the body surface even with clothes on, and should be useful for the analysis of temperature-related sensations as well as the design of comfortable environment or clothes. [Jpn J Physiol 55 Suppl:S221 (2005)]

The role of estrogen in the circadian change of body temperature in female rats

Nagashima Kei;Kobayashi Akiko;Yamanouchi Korehito

Proceedings of Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan 2005(0) p.S220 - S2202005-2005

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Outline:It is well known that thermoregulation is different between male and female, although the mechanism remains unclear yet. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of estrogen on thermoregulatory mechanisms for daily change of body temperature (Tb). Fist, we measured daily changes in Tb, metabolism, and body surface temperature in gonadectomized male and female rats (n=6 each) under 12:12h light-dark condition. Compared with normal rats, Tb in the female gonadectomized rats became unstable, showing 2-4 h irregular small oscillation, although chi-square analysis indicated that the period of the rhythm remained 24 h. However, there was no change in the Tb rhythm in the male gonadectomized rats. Second, silicon tubes containing E2 crystalline were subcutaneously implanted in the gonadectomized rats. In the female gonadectomized rats with the tubes, the Tb rhythm was restored to the normal pattern. However, there was no influence of E2 on the Tb rhythm in the male rats. The Tb change due to the gonadectomy is closely linked with both metabolism and body surface temperature. These results indicate that E2 is involved in the thermoregulation for daily change of Tb in female rats, but not in male rats. We also hypothesized that central neurons reacting both thermal and E2 stimuli would be closely associated with the mechanism. Therefore, histological analysis was conducted to test the hypothesis. [Jpn J Physiol 55 Suppl:S220 (2005)]

Effects of alcohol on thermoregulation during mild heat exposure in humans.

Yoda Tamae;Crawshaw Larry I;Nakamura Mayumi;Saito Kumiko;Konishi Aki;Nagashima Kei;Uchida Sunao;Kanosue Kazuyuki

Alcohol (Fayetteville, N.Y.) 36(3) 2005-2005

PubMed

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ISSN:0741-8329

Outline::We investigated the effects of alcohol on thermoregulatory responses and thermal sensations during mild heat exposure in humans. Eight healthy men participated in this study. Experiments were conducted twice for each subject at a room temperature of 33 degrees C. After a 30-min resting period, the subject drank either 15% alcohol (alcohol session) at a dose of 0.36 g/kg body weight or equal volume of water (control session). Skin blood flow and chest sweat rate in the alcohol session significantly increased over those in controls 10 min after drinking. Deep body temperature in the alcohol session started to decrease 20 min after the onset of sweating and eventually fell 0.3 degrees C lower than in the controls. Whole body hot sensation transiently increased after alcohol drinking, whereas it changed little after water drinking. The increased "hot" sensation would presumably cause cool-seeking behavior, if permitted. Thus, alcohol influences thermoregulation so that body core temperature is lowered not only by automatic mechanisms (sweating and skin vasodilation) but also behaviorally. These results suggest that decreases in body temperature after alcohol drinking are not secondary to skin vasodilation, a well-known effect of alcohol, but rather result from a decrease in the regulated body temperature evidenced by the coordinated modulation of various effectors of thermoregulation and sensation.

Regional differences in temperature sensation and thermal comfort in humans.

Nakamura Mayumi;Yoda Tamae;Crawshaw Larry I;Yasuhara Saki;Saito Yasuyo;Kasuga Momoko;Nagashima Kei;Kanosue Kazuyuki

Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) 105(6) 2008-2008

PubMedDOI

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ISSN:8750-7587

Outline::Sensations evoked by thermal stimulation (temperature-related sensations) can be divided into two categories, "temperature sensation" and "thermal comfort." Although several studies have investigated regional differences in temperature sensation, less is known about the sensitivity differences in thermal comfort for the various body regions. In the present study, we examined regional differences in temperature-related sensations with special attention to thermal comfort. Healthy male subjects sitting in an environment of mild heat or cold were locally cooled or warmed with water-perfused stimulators. Areas stimulated were the face, chest, abdomen, and thigh. Temperature sensation and thermal comfort of the stimulated areas were reported by the subjects, as was whole body thermal comfort. During mild heat exposure, facial cooling was most comfortable and facial warming was most uncomfortable. On the other hand, during mild cold exposure, neither warming nor cooling of the face had a major effect. The chest and abdomen had characteristics opposite to those of the face. Local warming of the chest and abdomen did produce a strong comfort sensation during whole body cold exposure. The thermal comfort seen in this study suggests that if given the chance, humans would preferentially cool the head in the heat, and they would maintain the warmth of the trunk areas in the cold. The qualitative differences seen in thermal comfort for the various areas cannot be explained solely by the density or properties of the peripheral thermal receptors and thus must reflect processing mechanisms in the central nervous system.

Associations between the orexin (hypocretin) receptor 2 gene polymorphism Val308Ile and nicotine dependence in genome-wide and subsequent association studies.

Nishizawa Daisuke;Kasai Shinya;Hasegawa Junko;Sato Naomi;Yamada Hidetaka;Tanioka Fumihiko;Nagashima Makoto;Katoh Ryoji;Satoh Yasuo;Tagami Megumi;Ujike Hiroshi;Ozaki Norio;Inada Toshiya;Iwata Nakao;Sora Ichiro;Iyo Masaomi;Yamada Mitsuhiko;Kondo Naoki;Won Moo-Jun;Naruse Nobuya;Uehara-Aoyama Kumi;Itokawa Masanari;Ohi Kazutaka;Hashimoto Ryota;Tanisawa Kumpei;Arai Tomio;Mori Seijiro;Sawabe Motoji;Naka-Mieno Makiko;Yamada Yoshiji;Yamada Miki;Sato Noriko;Muramatsu Masaaki;Tanaka Masashi;Irukayama-Tomobe Yoko;Saito Yuki C;Sakurai Takeshi;Hayashida Masakazu;Sugimura Haruhiko;Ikeda Kazutaka

Molecular brain 82015-2015

PubMedDOI

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ISSN:1756-6606

Outline:BACKGROUND:Many genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of nicotine dependence. Although several candidate gene variations have been reported by candidate gene studies or genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to be associated with smoking behavior and the vulnerability to nicotine dependence, such studies have been mostly conducted with subjects with European ancestry. However, genetic factors have rarely been investigated for the Japanese population as GWASs. To elucidate genetic factors involved in nicotine dependence in Japanese, the present study comprehensively explored genetic contributors to nicotine dependence by using whole-genome genotyping arrays with more than 200,000 markers in Japanese subjects.;RESULTS:The subjects for the GWAS and replication study were 148 and 374 patients, respectively. A two-stage GWAS was conducted using the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), Tobacco Dependence Screener (TDS), and number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) as indices of nicotine dependence. For the additional association analyses, patients who underwent major abdominal surgery, patients with methamphetamine dependence/psychosis, and healthy subjects with schizotypal personality trait data were recruited. Autopsy specimens with various diseases were also evaluated. After the study of associations between more than 200,000 marker single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the FTND, TDS, and CPD, the nonsynonymous rs2653349 SNP (located on the gene that encodes orexin [hypocretin] receptor 2) was selected as the most notable SNP associated with FTND, with a p value of 0.0005921 in the two-stage GWAS. This possible association was replicated for the remaining 374 samples. This SNP was also associated with postoperative pain, the initiation of methamphetamine use, schizotypal personality traits, and susceptibility to goiter.;CONCLUSIONS:Although the p value did not reach a conventional genome-wide level of significance in our two-stage GWAS, we obtained significant results in the subsequent analyses that suggest that the rs2653349 SNP (Val308Ile) could be a genetic factor that is related to nicotine dependence and possibly pain, schizotypal personality traits, and goiter in the Japanese population.

Measurements of Elliptic and Triangular Flow in High-Multiplicity 3He+Au Collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV.

Adare A;Afanasiev S;Aidala C;Ajitanand N N;Akiba Y;Akimoto R;Al-Bataineh H;Alexander J;Alfred M;Al-Ta'ani H;Andrews K R;Angerami A;Aoki K;Apadula N;Aphecetche L;Appelt E;Aramaki Y;Armendariz R;Aronson S H;Asai J;Asano H;Aschenauer E C;Atomssa E T;Averbeck R;Awes T C;Azmoun B;Babintsev V;Bai M;Baksay G;Baksay L;Baldisseri A;Bandara N S;Bannier B;Barish K N;Barnes P D;Bassalleck B;Basye A T;Bathe S;Batsouli S;Baublis V;Baumann C;Bazilevsky A;Beaumier M;Beckman S;Belikov S;Belmont R;Ben-Benjamin J;Bennett R;Berdnikov A;Berdnikov Y;Bhom J H;Bickley A A;Blau D S;Boissevain J G;Bok J S;Borel H;Boyle K;Brooks M L;Broxmeyer D;Bryslawskyj J;Buesching H;Bumazhnov V;Bunce G;Butsyk S;Camacho C M;Campbell S;Caringi A;Castera P;Chang B S;Chang W C;Charvet J-L;Chen C-H;Chernichenko S;Chi C Y;Chiba J;Chiu M;Choi I J;Choi J B;Choudhury R K;Christiansen P;Chujo T;Chung P;Churyn A;Chvala O;Cianciolo V;Citron Z;Cleven C R;Cole B A;Comets M P;Conesa del Valle Z;Connors M;Constantin P;Csanád M;Csörgő T;Dahms T;Dairaku S;Danchev I;Danley D;Das K;Datta A;Daugherity M S;David G;Dayananda M K;Deaton M B;DeBlasio K;Dehmelt K;Delagrange H;Denisov A;d'Enterria D;Deshpande A;Desmond E J;Dharmawardane K V;Dietzsch O;Dion A;Diss P B;Do J H;Donadelli M;D'Orazio L;Drapier O;Drees A;Drees K A;Dubey A K;Durham J M;Durum A;Dutta D;Dzhordzhadze V;Edwards S;Efremenko Y V;Egdemir J;Ellinghaus F;Emam W S;Engelmore T;Enokizono A;En'yo H;Esumi S;Eyser K O;Fadem B;Feege N;Fields D E;Finger M;Finger M;Fleuret F;Fokin S L;Fraenkel Z;Frantz J E;Franz A;Frawley A D;Fujiwara K;Fukao Y;Fusayasu T;Gadrat S;Gal C;Gallus P;Garg P;Garishvili I;Ge H;Giordano F;Glenn A;Gong H;Gong X;Gonin M;Gosset J;Goto Y;Granier de Cassagnac R;Grau N;Greene S V;Grim G;Grosse Perdekamp M;Gu Y;Gunji T;Guo L;Gustafsson H-Å;Hachiya T;Hadj Henni A;Haegemann C;Haggerty J S;Hahn K I;Hamagaki H;Hamblen J;Hamilton H F;Han R;Han S Y;Hanks J;Harada H;Harper C;Hartouni E P;Haruna K;Hasegawa S;Haseler T O S;Hashimoto K;Haslum E;Hayano R;He X;Heffner M;Hemmick T K;Hester T;Hiejima H;Hill J C;Hobbs R;Hohlmann M;Hollis R S;Holzmann W;Homma K;Hong B;Horaguchi T;Hori Y;Hornback D;Hoshino T;Hotvedt N;Huang J;Huang S;Ichihara T;Ichimiya R;Iinuma H;Ikeda Y;Imai K;Imrek J;Inaba M;Inoue Y;Iordanova A;Isenhower D;Isenhower L;Ishihara M;Isobe T;Issah M;Isupov A;Ivanishchev D;Iwanaga Y;Jacak B V;Jezghani M;Jia J;Jiang X;Jin J;Jinnouchi O;John D;Johnson B M;Jones T;Joo K S;Jouan D;Jumper D S;Kajihara F;Kametani S;Kamihara N;Kamin J;Kanda S;Kaneta M;Kaneti S;Kang B H;Kang J H;Kang J S;Kanou H;Kapustinsky J;Karatsu K;Kasai M;Kawall D;Kawashima M;Kazantsev A V;Kempel T;Key J A;Khachatryan V;Khanzadeev A;Kijima K M;Kikuchi J;Kim A;Kim B I;Kim C;Kim D H;Kim D J;Kim E;Kim E-J;Kim G W;Kim M;Kim S H;Kim Y-J;Kim Y K;Kimelman B;Kinney E;Kiriluk K;Kiss Á;Kistenev E;Kitamura R;Kiyomichi A;Klatsky J;Klay J;Klein-Boesing C;Kleinjan D;Kline P;Koblesky T;Kochenda L;Kochetkov V;Komkov B;Konno M;Koster J;Kotchetkov D;Kotov D;Kozlov A;Král A;Kravitz A;Kubart J;Kunde G J;Kurihara N;Kurita K;Kurosawa M;Kweon M J;Kwon Y;Kyle G S;Lacey R;Lai Y S;Lajoie J G;Layton D;Lebedev A;Lee D M;Lee J;Lee K B;Lee K S;Lee M K;Lee S;Lee S H;Lee S R;Lee T;Leitch M J;Leite M A L;Lenzi B;Li X;Lichtenwalner P;Liebing P;Lim S H;Linden Levy L A;Liška T;Litvinenko A;Liu H;Liu M X;Love B;Lynch D;Maguire C F;Makdisi Y I;Makek M;Malakhov A;Malik M D;Manion A;Manko V I;Mannel E;Mao Y;Mašek L;Masui H;Matathias F;McCumber M;McGaughey P L;McGlinchey D;McKinney C;Means N;Meles A;Mendoza M;Meredith B;Miake Y;Mibe T;Mignerey A C;Mikeš P;Miki K;Miller T E;Milov A;Mioduszewski S;Mishra D K;Mishra M;Mitchell J T;Mitrovski M;Miyachi Y;Miyasaka S;Mizuno S;Mohanty A K;Montuenga P;Moon H J;Moon T;Morino Y;Morreale A;Morrison D P;Motschwiller S;Moukhanova T V;Mukhopadhyay D;Murakami T;Murata J;Mwai A;Nagamiya S;Nagashima K;Nagata Y;Nagle J L;Naglis M;Nagy M I;Nakagawa I;Nakagomi H;Nakamiya Y;Nakamura K R;Nakamura T;Nakano K;Nam S;Nattrass C;Netrakanti P K;Newby J;Nguyen M;Nihashi M;Niida T;Nishimura S;Norman B E;Nouicer R;Novak T;Novitzky N;Nyanin A S;Oakley C;O'Brien E;Oda S X;Ogilvie C A;Ohnishi H;Oka M;Okada K;Omiwade O O;Onuki Y;Orjuela Koop J D;Osborn J D;Oskarsson A;Ouchida M;Ozawa K;Pak R;Pal D;Palounek A P T;Pantuev V;Papavassiliou V;Park B H;Park I H;Park J;Park J S;Park S;Park S K;Park W J;Pate S F;Patel L;Patel M;Pei H;Peng J-C;Pereira H;Perepelitsa D V;Perera G D N;Peresedov V;Peressounko D Yu;Perry J;Petti R;Pinkenburg C;Pinson R;Pisani R P;Proissl M;Purschke M L;Purwar A K;Qu H;Rak J;Rakotozafindrabe A;Ramson B J;Ravinovich I;Read K F;Rembeczki S;Reuter M;Reygers K;Reynolds D;Riabov V;Riabov Y;Richardson E;Rinn T;Roach D;Roche G;Rolnick S D;Romana A;Rosati M;Rosen C A;Rosendahl S S E;Rosnet P;Rowan Z;Rubin J G;Rukoyatkin P;Ružička P;Rykov V L;Sahlmueller B;Saito N;Sakaguchi T;Sakai S;Sakashita K;Sakata H;Sako H;Samsonov V;Sano S;Sarsour M;Sato S;Sato T;Savastio M;Sawada S;Schaefer B;Schmoll B K;Sedgwick K;Seele J;Seidl R;Semenov A Yu;Semenov V;Sen A;Seto R;Sett P;Sexton A;Sharma D;Shein I;Shevel A;Shibata T-A;Shigaki K;Shim H H;Shimomura M;Shoji K;Shukla P;Sickles A;Silva C L;Silvermyr D;Silvestre C;Sim K S;Singh B K;Singh C P;Singh V;Skutnik S;Slunečka M;Snowball M;Sodre T;Soldatov A;Soltz R A;Sondheim W E;Sorensen S P;Sourikova I V;Staley F;Stankus P W;Stenlund E;Stepanov M;Ster A;Stoll S P;Sugitate T;Suire C;Sukhanov A;Sumita T;Sun J;Sziklai J;Tabaru T;Takagi S;Takagui E M;Takahara A;Taketani A;Tanabe R;Tanaka Y;Taneja S;Tanida K;Tannenbaum M J;Tarafdar S;Taranenko A;Tarján P;Tennant E;Themann H;Thomas D;Thomas T L;Tieulent R;Timilsina A;Todoroki T;Togawa M;Toia A;Tojo J;Tomášek L;Tomášek M;Tomita Y;Torii H;Towell C L;Towell R;Towell R S;Tram V-N;Tserruya I;Tsuchimoto Y;Utsunomiya K;Vale C;Valle H;van Hecke H W;Vazquez-Zambrano E;Veicht A;Velkovska J;Vértesi R;Vinogradov A A;Virius M;Vossen A;Vrba V;Vznuzdaev E;Wagner M;Walker D;Wang X R;Watanabe D;Watanabe K;Watanabe Y;Watanabe Y S;Wei F;Wei R;Wessels J;White A S;White S N;Winter D;Woody C L;Wright R M;Wysocki M;Xia B;Xie W;Xue L;Yalcin S;Yamaguchi Y L;Yamaura K;Yang R;Yanovich A;Yasin Z;Ying J;Yokkaichi S;Yoo J H;Yoo J S;Yoon I;You Z;Young G R;Younus I;Yu H;Yushmanov I E;Zajc W A;Zaudtke O;Zelenski A;Zhang C;Zhou S;Zimamyi J;Zolin L;Zou L;

Physical review letters 115(14) 2015-2015

PubMedDOI

Detail

ISSN:1079-7114

Outline::We present the first measurement of elliptic (v(2)) and triangular (v(3)) flow in high-multiplicity (3)He+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200  GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in (3)He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the (3)He+Au system. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v(2) and triangular v(3) anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v(2) values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three (3)He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.

Thermal information from the skin: the signal processing and the role in behavioral thermoregulation.

Nagashima Kei

Temperature (Austin, Tex.) 2(3)

PubMedDOI

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ISSN:2332-8940

Synthetic Posttranslational Modifications: Chemical Catalyst-Driven Regioselective Histone Acylation of Native Chromatin.

Amamoto Yoshifumi;Aoi Yuki;Nagashima Nozomu;Suto Hiroki;Yoshidome Daisuke;Arimura Yasuhiro;Osakabe Akihisa;Kato Daiki;Kurumizaka Hitoshi;Kawashima Shigehiro A;Yamatsugu Kenzo;Kanai Motomu

Journal of the American Chemical Society 139(22) 2017-2017

PubMedDOI

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ISSN:1520-5126

Outline::Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of histones play an important role in the complex regulatory mechanisms governing gene transcription, and their dysregulation can cause diseases such as cancer. The lack of methods for site-selectively modifying native chromatin, however, limits our understanding of the functional roles of a specific histone PTM, not as a single mark, but in the intertwined PTM network. Here, we report a synthetic catalyst DMAP-SH (DSH), which activates chemically stable thioesters (including acetyl-CoA) under physiological conditions and transfers various acyl groups to the proximate amino groups. Our data suggest that DSH, conjugated with a nucleosome ligand, such as pyrrole-imidazole-polyamide and LANA (latency-associated nuclear antigen)-peptide, promotes both natural (including acetylation, butyrylation, malonylation, and ubiquitination) and non-natural (azido- and phosphoryl labeling) PTMs on histones in recombinant nucleosomes and/or in native chromatin, at lysine residues close to the DSH moiety. To investigate the validity of our method, we used LANA-DSH to promote histone H2B lysine-120 (K120) acylation, the function of which is largely unknown. H2BK120 acetylation and malonylation modulated higher-order chromatin structures by reducing internucleosomal interactions, and this modulation was further enhanced by histone tail acetylation. This approach, therefore, may have versatile applications for dissecting the regulatory mechanisms underlying chromatin function.

Reflex activation of rat fusimotor neurons by body surface cooling, and its dependence on the medullary raphé

Tanaka, Mutsumi; Owens, Neil C.; Nagashima, Kei; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; McAllen, Robin M.

Journal of Physiology 572(2) p.569 - 5832006/04-2006/04

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ISSN:00223751

Outline:The nature of muscle efferent fibre activation during whole body cooling was investigated in urethane-anaesthetizedrats. Multiunit efferent activity to the gastrocnemius muscle was detected when the trunk skin was cooled by a water-perfused jacket to below 36.0 ± 0.7°C That efferent activity was not blocked by hexamethonium (50 mg kg -1 , I.V.) and was not associated with movement or electromyographic activity. Cold-induced efferent activity enhanced the discharge of afferent filaments from the isotonically stretched gastrocnemius muscle, demonstrating that it was fusimotor. Fusimotor neurons were activated by falls in trunk skin temperature, but that activity ceased when the skin was rewarmed, regardless of how low core temperature had fallen. While low core temperature alone was ineffective, a high core temperature could inhibit the fusimotor response to skin cooling. Fusimotor activation by skin cooling was often accompanied by desynchronization of the frontal electroencephalogram (EEG), but was not a simple consequence of cortical arousal, in that warming the scrotum desynchronized the EEG without activating fusimotor fibres. Inhibition of neurons in the rostral medullary raphé by microinjections of glycine (0.5 M, 120-180 nl) reduced the fusimotor response to skin cooling by 95 ± 3%, but did not prevent the EEG response. These results are interpreted as showing a novel thermoregulatory reflex that is triggered by cold exposure. It may underlie the increased muscle tone that precedes overt shivering, and could also serve to amplify shivering. Like several other cold-defence responses, this reflex depends upon neurons in the rostral medullary raphé. © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 The Physiological Society.

Intragastric administration of capsiate, a transient receptor potential channel agonist, triggers thermogenic sympathetic responses

Ono, Kaori; Ono, Kaori; Tsukamoto-Yasui, Masako; Hara-Kimura, Yoshiko; Inoue, Naohiko; Nogusa, Yoshihito; Okabe, Yuki; Nagashima, Kei; Kato, Fusao

Journal of Applied Physiology 110(3) p.789 - 7982011/03-2011/03

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ISSN:87507587

Outline:Ono K, Tsukamoto-Yasui M, Hara-Kimura Y, Inoue N, Nogusa Y, Okabe Y, Nagashima K, Kato F. Intragastric administration of capsiate, a transient receptor potential channel agonist, triggers thermogenic sympathetic responses. J Appl Physiol 110: 789-798, 2011. First published November 11, 2010; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00128.2010.- The sympathetic thermoregulatory system controls the magnitude of adaptive thermogenesis in correspondence with the environmental temperature or the state of energy intake and plays a key role in determining the resultant energy storage. However, the nature of the trigger initiating this reflex arc remains to be determined. Here, using capsiate, a digestion-vulnerable capsaicin analog, we examined the involvement of specific activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels within the gastrointestinal tract in the thermogenic sympathetic system by measuring the efferent activity of the postganglionic sympathetic nerve innervating brown adipose tissue (BAT) in anesthetized rats. Intragastric administration of capsiate resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in integrated BAT sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) over 180 min, which was characterized by an emergence of sporadic high-activity phases composed of lowfrequency bursts. This increase in BAT SNA was abolished by blockade of TRP channels as well as of sympathetic ganglionic transmission and was inhibited by ablation of the gastrointestinal vagus nerve. The activation of SNA was delimited to BAT and did not occur in the heart or pancreas. These results point to a neural pathway enabling the selective activation of the central network regulating the BAT SNA in response to a specific stimulation of gastrointestinal TRP channels and offer important implications for understanding the dietary-dependent regulation of energy metabolism and control of obesity. Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society.

Relational structure analysis of fuzzy graph and its application: For analyzing fuzzy data of human relation

Uesu, Hiroaki; Nagashima, Kenichi; Chung, Hsunhsun; Tsuda, Ei

IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems p.1593 - 15972011/09-2011/09

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ISSN:10987584

Outline:Generally, we could efficiently analyze the inexact information and investigate the fuzzy relation by applying the fuzzy graph theory [1] . We would extend the fuzzy graph theory, and propose a fuzzy node fuzzy graph. Since a fuzzy node fuzzy graph is complicated to analyze, we would transform it to a simple fuzzy graph by using T-norm family. In addition, to investigate the relations between nodes, we would define the fuzzy contingency table. In this paper, we would discuss about five subjects, (1) new T-norm "Uesu product", (2) fuzzy node fuzzy graph, (3) fuzzy contingency table, (4) decision analysis of the optimal fuzzy graph G λ0 in the fuzzy graph sequence {G λ } and (5) its application to sociometry analysis. By using the fuzzy node fuzzy graph theory, the new T-norm and the fuzzy contingency table, we could clarify the relational structure of fuzzy information. According to the decision method in section 2, we could find the optimal fuzzy graph G 0 in the fuzzy graph sequence {G λ }, and clarify the structural feature of the fuzzy node fuzzy graph. Moreover, we would illustrate its practical effectiveness with the case study concerning sociometry analysis. © 2011 IEEE.

Fuzzy cluster analysis and its application on international stock prices

Motegi, Kaiji; Shinkai, Kimiaki; Uesu, Hiroaki; Kanagawa, Shuya; Chung, Hsunhsun; Nagashima, Kenichi

Proceedings - 3rd International Conference on Innovations in Bio-Inspired Computing and Applications, IBICA 2012 p.34 - 382012/12-2012/12

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Outline:This paper applies fuzzy cluster analysis to investigate co movement of Asian and U.S. stock prices from the viewpoints of both region and industry. Specifically, we analyze daily stock price data of Chinese, Indian, Japanese, South Korean, and U.S. firms from 2005 through 2011. The past literature has never used daily data because of non-synchronous trading times and holidays, but we resolve this problem by analyzing American depositary receipts traded in the New York Stock Exchange instead of underlying shares traded all over the world. Partition trees computed each year provide overwhelming evidence that the country effect always surpasses the industry effect (i.e., shares from the same country tend to move together but shares within the same industry do not). This finding is particularly informative for portfolio managers, choosing a country and then many kinds of industry therein is a riskier strategy than choosing an industry and then many countries. Besides this practical implication, the dominant country effect highlights a slow process of globalization. Nationality of shares should not matter in a globalized world, but there still exist barriers segmenting countries. All these results and implications are robust to different clustering methods, the frequency of data, and foreign exchange rates. © 2012 IEEE.

Estrogen modulates central and peripheral responses to cold in female rats

UCHIDA Yuki;KANO Masumi;YASUHARA Saki;KOBAYASHI Akiko;TOKIZAWA Ken;NAGASHIMA Kei

The journal of physiological sciences 60(2) p.151 - 1602010/03-2010/03

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ISSN:18806546

Effects of warming the lower back with a heat and steam generating sheet on thermoregulatory responses and sensation

Oda Hideshi;Igaki Michihito;Ugajin Toru;Suzuki Atsushi;Tsuchiya Shuichi;Nagashima Kei;Iso Shigeo;Kanosue Kazuyuki

JAPANESE JOURNAL OF BIOMETEOROLOGY 43(1) p.43 - 502006-2006

CiNii

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ISSN:0389-1313

Outline:In this study, we developed a heat and steam generating (HSG) sheet that generates steam for several hours, and analyzed its effects on thermoregulatory responses and thermal sensation. In seven healthy male subjects the lumbar region (lower back) was warmed for four hours in a cool environment of 20°C and 40%RH. For each subject, three experiments were performed: 1) warming the lower back with a HSG sheet (12×20 cm), 2) warming with a heat generating (HG) sheet without steam, and 3) no warming (control). The skin and subcutaneous temperatures in and around the warmed area, as well as rectal temperature were measured. The subjects reported whole body thermal comfort, and local sensations in the warmed area. While the temperature under the sheet was similar between the HSG and HG sheets (approximately 38.5°C), skin temperature at 2 cm from the sheet was about 0.9°C higher (p<0.05) for the HSG sheet than the HG sheet. The subjects reported less whole body coldness during the warming by the HSG sheet than the HG sheet. They also reported stronger and more spreading warm sensation in the warmed region for the HSG sheet than the HG sheet. In a separate experiment using an apparatus with a heat flux sensor, higher heat flux was observed for the HSG sheet than the HG sheet, even though both sheets gave the same surface temperature. These results suggest that warming the skin with steam is more efficient than warming it with dry air.

The involvement of Cry1 and Cry2 genes in the regulation of the circadian body temperature rhythm in mice.

Nagashima Kei;Matsue Kenta;Konishi Masahiro;Iidaka Chisato;Miyazaki Koyomi;Ishida Norio;Kanosue Kazuyuki

American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology 288(1) 2005-2005

PubMed

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ISSN:0363-6119

Outline::The criptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2) are involved in the molecular mechanism that controls the circadian clock, and mice lacking these genes (Cry1(-/-)/Cry2(-/-)) are behaviorally arrhythmic. It has been speculated that the circadian clock modulates the characteristics of thermoregulation, resulting in body temperature (T(b)) rhythm. However, there is no direct evidence proving this speculation. We show here that T(b) and heat production in Cry1(-/-)/Cry2(-/-) mice are arrhythmic under constant darkness. In contrast, both rhythms occur under a light-dark cycle and/or periodical food restriction linked with spontaneous activity and/or eating, although they are not robust as those in wild-type mice. The relationship between heat production and T(b) in Cry1(-/-)/Cry2(-/-) mice is linear and identical under any conditions, indicating that their T(b) rhythm is determined by heat production rhythm associated with activity and eating. However, T(b) in wild-type mice is maintained at a relatively higher level in the active phase than the inactive phase regardless of the heat production level. These results indicate that the thermoregulatory responses are modulated according to the circadian phase, and the Cry genes are involved in this mechanism.

Central mechanisms for thermoregulation in a hot environment.

Nagashima Kei

Industrial health 44(3) 2006-2006

PubMed

Detail

ISSN:0019-8366

Outline::Homeothermic animals regulate body temperature by autonomic and behavioral thermoeffector responses. The regulation is conducted mainly in the brain. Especially, the preoptic area (PO) in the hypothalamus plays a key role. The PO has abundant warm-sensitive neurons, sending excitatory signals to the brain regions involved in heat loss mechanisms, and inhibitory signals to those involved in heat production mechanisms. The sympathetic fibers determine tail blood flow in rats, which is an effective heat loss process. Some areas in the midbrain and medulla are involved in the control of tail blood flow. Recent study also showed that the hypothalamus is involved in heat escape behavior in rats. However, our knowledge about behavioral regulation is limited. The central mechanism for thermal comfort and discomfort, which induce various behavioral responses, should be clarified. In the heat, dehydration affects both autonomic and behavioral thermoregulation by non-thermoregulatory factors such as high Na+ concentration. The PO seems to be closely involved in these responses. The knowledge about the central mechanisms involved in thermoregulation is important to improve industrial health, e.g. preventing accidents associated with the heat or organizing more comfortable working environment.

Thermoregulation in the cold changes depending on the time of day and feeding condition: physiological and anatomical analyses of involved circadian mechanisms.

Tokizawa K;Uchida Y;Nagashima K

Neuroscience 164(3) 2009-2009

PubMedDOI

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ISSN:1873-7544

Outline::The circadian rhythm of body temperature (T(b)) is a well-known phenomenon. However, it is unknown how the circadian system including the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and clock genes affects thermoregulation. Food deprivation in mice induces a greater reduction of T(b) particularly in the light phase. We examined the role of Clock, one of key clock genes and the SCN during induced hypothermia. At 20 degrees C with fasting, mice increased their metabolic heat production in the dark phase and maintained T(b), whereas in the light phase, heat production was less, resulting in hypothermia. Under these conditions, neuronal activity in the SCN, assessed by cFos expression, increased only in the light phase. However, such differences in thermoregulatory and neural responses between the phases in Clock mutant mice were less marked. The neural network between the SCN and paraventricular nucleus appeared to be important in hypothermia. These findings suggest that the circadian system per se is influenced by both the feeding condition and environmental temperature and that it modulates thermoregulation.

Fos activation in hypothalamic neurons during cold or warm exposure: Projections to periaqueductal gray matter

Yoshida, K.; Konishi, M.; Nagashima, K.; Saper, C. B.; Kanosue, K.; Kanosue, K.

Neuroscience 133(4) p.1039 - 10462005/06-2005/06

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ISSN:03064522

Outline:The hypothalamus, especially the preoptic area, plays a crucial role in thermoregulation, and our previous studies showed that the periaqueductal gray matter is important for transmitting efferent signals to thermoregulatory effectors in rats. Neurons responsible for skin vasodilation are located in the lateral portion of the rostral periaqueductal gray matter, and neurons that mediate non-shivering thermogenesis are located in the ventrolateral part of the caudal periaqueductal gray matter. We investigated the distribution of neurons in the rat hypothalamus that are activated by exposure to neutral (26°C), warm (33°C), or cold (10°C) ambient temperature and project to the rostral periaqueductal gray matter or caudal periaqueductal gray matter, by using the immunohistochemical analysis of Fos and a retrograde tracer, cholera toxin-b. When cholera toxin-b was injected into the rostral periaqueductal gray matter, many double-labeled cells were observed in the median preoptic nucleus in warm-exposed rats, but few were seen in cold-exposed rats. On the other hand, when cholera toxin-b was injected into the caudal periaqueductal gray matter, many double-labeled cells were seen in a cell group extending from the dorsomedial nucleus through the dorsal hypothalamic area in cold-exposed rats but few were seen in warm-exposed rats. These results suggest that the rostral periaqueductal gray matter receives input from the median preoptic nucleus neurons activated by warm exposure, and the caudal periaqueductal gray matter receives input from neurons in the dorsomedial nucleus/dorsal hypothalamic area region activated by cold exposure. These efferent pathways provide a substrate for thermoregulatory skin vasomotor response and non-shivering thermogenesis, respectively. © 2005 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Assessment of axillary temperature for the evaluation of normal body temperature of healthy young adults at rest in a thermoneutral environment.

Marui Shuri;Misawa Ayaka;Tanaka Yuki;Nagashima Kei

Journal of physiological anthropology 36(1) 2017-2017

PubMedDOI

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ISSN:1880-6805

Outline:BACKGROUND:The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate whether recently introduced methods of measuring axillary temperature are reliable, (2) examine if individuals know their baseline body temperature based on an actual measurement, and (3) assess the factors affecting axillary temperature and reevaluate the meaning of the axillary temperature.;METHODS:Subjects were healthy young men and women (n = 76 and n = 65, respectively). Three measurements were obtained: (1) axillary temperature using a digital thermometer in a predictive mode requiring 10 s (Tax-10 s), (2) axillary temperature using a digital thermometer in a standard mode requiring 10 min (Tax-10 min), and (3) tympanic membrane temperature continuously measured by infrared thermometry (Tty). The subjects answered questions about eating and exercise habits, sleep and menstrual cycles, and thermoregulation and reported what they believed their regular body temperature to be (Treg).;RESULTS:Treg, Tax-10 s, Tax-10 min, and Ttywere 36.2 ± 0.4, 36.4 ± 0.5, 36.5 ± 0.4, and 36.8 ± 0.3 °C (mean ± SD), respectively. There were correlations between Ttyand Tax-10 min, Ttyand Tax-10 s, and Tax-10 minand Tax-10 s(r = .62, r = .46, and r = .59, respectively, P < .001), but not between Tregand Tax-10 s(r = .11, P = .20). A lower Tax-10 swas associated with smaller body mass indices and irregular menstrual cycles.;CONCLUSIONS:Modern devices for measuring axillary temperature may have changed the range of body temperature that is recognized as normal. Core body temperature variations estimated by tympanic measurements were smaller than those estimated by axillary measurements. This variation of axillary temperature may be due to changes in the measurement methods introduced by modern devices and techniques. However, axillary temperature values correlated well with those of tympanic measurements, suggesting that the technique may reliably report an individual's state of health. It is important for individuals to know their baseline axillary temperature to evaluate subsequent temperature measurements as normal or abnormal. Moreover, axillary temperature variations may, in part, reflect fat mass and changes due to the menstrual cycle.

Effects of alcohol on thermoregulation during mild heat exposure in humans

Yoda, Tamae; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Nakamura, Mayumi; Saito, Kumiko; Konishi, Aki; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Uchida, Sunao; Uchida, Sunao; Uchida, Sunao; Uchida, Sunao; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

Alcohol 36(3) p.195 - 2002005/07-2005/07

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ISSN:07418329

Outline:We investigated the effects of alcohol on thermoregulatory responses and thermal sensations during mild heat exposure in humans. Eight healthy men participated in this study. Experiments were conducted twice for each subject at a room temperature of 33°C. After a 30-min resting period, the subject drank either 15% alcohol (alcohol session) at a dose of 0.36 g/kg body weight or equal volume of water (control session). Skin blood flow and chest sweat rate in the alcohol session significantly increased over those in controls 10 min after drinking. Deep body temperature in the alcohol session started to decrease 20 min after the onset of sweating and eventually fell 0.3°C lower than in the controls. Whole body hot sensation transiently increased after alcohol drinking, whereas it changed little after water drinking. The increased "hot" sensation would presumably cause cool-seeking behavior, if permitted. Thus, alcohol influences thermoregulation so that body core temperature is lowered not only by automatic mechanisms (sweating and skin vasodilation) but also behaviorally. These results suggest that decreases in body temperature after alcohol drinking are not secondary to skin vasodilation, a well-known effect of alcohol, but rather result from a decrease in the regulated body temperature evidenced by the coordinated modulation of various effectors of thermoregulation and sensation. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

The median preoptic nucleus is involved in the facilitation of heat-escape/cold-seeking behavior during systemic salt loading in rats

Konishi, Masahiro; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kano, Masumi; Kobayashi, Akiko; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei

American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology 292(1) 2007/01-2007/01

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ISSN:03636119

Outline:Systemic salt loading has been reported to facilitate operant heat-escape/cold-seeking behavior. In the present study, we hypothesized that the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) would be involved in this mechanism. Rats were divided into two groups (n = 6 each): one group had the MnPO lesion with ibotenic acid (4.0 μg) and the other was the vehicle control. After subcutaneous injection (10 ml/kg) of either isotonic- (154 mM) or hypertonic-saline (2,500 mM), each rat was placed in a behavior box, where the ambient temperature was changed to 26°C, 35°C, and 40°C every 1 h. The position of a rat in the box and the body core temperature (T core ) were monitored. A rat could trigger 0°C air for 45 s in the 35°C and 40°C heat when moved in a specific area in the box (operant behavior). In the control group, counts of the operant behavior were greater (P = 0.05) in the hypertonic- than in the isotonic-saline injection (17 ± 2 and 10 ± 2 at 35°C, 24 ± 2 and 18 ± 1 at 40°C). T core remained unchanged throughout the exposure, although the level was lower (P < 0.05) in the hypertonic- than in the isotonic-saline trial (36.6 ± 0.2°C and 37.4 ± 0.1°C at 26°C and 36.9 ± 0.2°C and 37.4 > 0.1°C at 40°C, respectively). However, in the MnPO-lesion group, counts of the behavior were similar between the hypertonic- and isotonic-saline injection trials (10 ± 2 and 8 ± 1 at 35°C, and 17 ± 1 and 16 ± 1 at 40°C, respectively). T core increased (P < 0.05) in the heat in both trials (36.8 ± 0.1°C and 37.4 ± 0.1°C at 26°C and 37.4 ± 0.2°C and 37.8 ± 0.2°C at 40°C in the hypertonic- and isotonic-saline injection trials, respectively). These results may suggest that, at least in part, the MnPO is involved in the facilitation of heat-escape/cold-seeking behavior during osmotic stimulation. Copyright © 2007 the American Physiological Society.

A new system for the analysis of thermal judgments: Multipoint measurements of skin temperatures and temperature-related sensations and their joint visualization

Nakamura, Mayumi; Nakamura, Mayumi; Esaki, Hidenori; Yoda, Tamae; Yasuhara, Saki; Kobayashi, Akiko; Konishi, Aki; Osawa, Naoki; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

Journal of Physiological Sciences 56(6) p.459 - 4642006/12-2006/12

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ISSN:18806546

Outline:We report a new system for monitoring sensations of many body parts as well as comprehensively showing the distribution of overall skin temperature (T sk ) and temperature-related sensations. The system consists of a console with 52 levers to report temperature-related sensations and software that facilitates the visualization of the distribution of T sk and temperature-related sensations by displaying them on a model of the human body. The system's utility was demonstrated with a physiological experiment involving three males and three females. They were exposed to step changes of ambient temperature from 23° C to 33° C. We measured T sk at 50 points, and the subjects concurrently provided estimates of local temperature sensation and thermal comfort/discomfort at 25 loci. This system greatly facilitates the perception and analysis of spatial relationships and differences in temperature and sensation in various areas of the body.

Effects of posture on peripheral vascular responses to lower body positive pressure

Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Hayashida, Shigeko; Kitano, Asami; Nagashima, Kei; Ichinose, Masashi

American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology 293(1) 2007/07-2007/07

PubMedDOIScopus

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ISSN:03636135

Outline:We tested the hypothesis that peripheral vascular responses (in the lower and upper limbs) to application of lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are dependent on the posture of the subjects. We measured heart rate, stroke volume, mean arterial pressure, leg and forearm blood flow (using the Doppler ultrasound technique), and leg (LVC) and forearm (FVC) vascular conductance in 11 subjects (9 men, 2 women) without and with LBPP (25 and 50 mmHg) in supine and upright postures. Mean arterial pressure increased in proportion to increases in LBPP and was greater in supine than in upright subjects. Heart rate was unchanged when LBPP was applied to supine subjects but was reduced in upright ones. Leg blood flow and LVC were both reduced by LBPP in supine subjects [LVC: 4.8 (SD 4.0), 3.6 (SD 3.5), and 1.4 (SD 1.8) ml·min -1 ·mmHg -1 before LBPP and during 25 and 50 mmHg LBPP, respectively; P < 0.05] but were increased in upright ones [LVC: 2.0 (SD 1.2), 3.4 (SD 3.4), and 3.0 (SD 2.0) ml·min -1 ·mmHg -1 , respectively; P < 0.05]. Forearm blood flow and FVC both declined when LBPP was applied to supine subjects [FVC: 1.3 (SD 0.6), 1.0 (SD 0.4), and 0.9 (SD 0.6) ml·min -1 ·mmHg -1 , respectively; P < 0.05] but remained unchanged in upright ones [FVC: 0.7 (SD 0.4), 0.7 (SD 0.4), and 0.6 (SD 0.5) ml·min -1 ·mmHg -1 , respectively]. Together, these findings indicate that the leg vascular response to application of LBPP is posture dependent and that the response differs in the lower and upper limbs when subjects assume an upright posture. Copyright © 2007 the American Physiological Society.

Regional differences in temperature sensation and thermal comfort in humans

Nakamura, Mayumi; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoda, Tamae; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Yasuhara, Saki; Saito, Yasuyo; Kasuga, Momoko; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

Journal of Applied Physiology 105(6) p.1897 - 19062008/12-2008/12

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ISSN:87507587

Outline:Sensations evoked by thermal stimulation (temperature-related sensations) can be divided into two categories, "temperature sensation" and "thermal comfort." Although several studies have investigated regional differences in temperature sensation, less is known about the sensitivity differences in thermal comfort for the various body regions. In the present study, we examined regional differences in temperature-related sensations with special attention to thermal comfort. Healthy male subjects sitting in an environment of mild heat or cold were locally cooled or warmed with water-perfused stimulators. Areas stimulated were the face, chest, abdomen, and thigh. Temperature sensation and thermal comfort of the stimulated areas were reported by the subjects, as was whole body thermal comfort. During mild heat exposure, facial cooling was most comfortable and facial warming was most uncomfortable. On the other hand, during mild cold exposure, neither warming nor cooling of the face had a major effect. The chest and abdomen had characteristics opposite to those of the face. Local warming of the chest and abdomen did produce a strong comfort sensation during whole body cold exposure. The thermal comfort seen in this study suggests that if given the chance, humans would preferentially cool the head in the heat, and they would maintain the warmth of the trunk areas in the cold. The qualitative differences seen in thermal comfort for the various areas cannot be explained solely by the density or properties of the peripheral thermal receptors and thus must reflect processing mechanisms in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2008 the American Physiological Society.

Thermoregulation in the cold changes depending on the time of day and feeding condition: physiological and anatomical analyses of involved circadian mechanisms

Tokizawa, K.; Uchida, Y.; Nagashima, K.; Nagashima, K.

Neuroscience 164(3) p.1377 - 13862009/12-2009/12

PubMedDOIScopus

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ISSN:03064522

Outline:The circadian rhythm of body temperature (T b ) is a well-known phenomenon. However, it is unknown how the circadian system including the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and clock genes affects thermoregulation. Food deprivation in mice induces a greater reduction of T b particularly in the light phase. We examined the role of Clock, one of key clock genes and the SCN during induced hypothermia. At 20 °C with fasting, mice increased their metabolic heat production in the dark phase and maintained T b , whereas in the light phase, heat production was less, resulting in hypothermia. Under these conditions, neuronal activity in the SCN, assessed by cFos expression, increased only in the light phase. However, such differences in thermoregulatory and neural responses between the phases in Clock mutant mice were less marked. The neural network between the SCN and paraventricular nucleus appeared to be important in hypothermia. These findings suggest that the circadian system per se is influenced by both the feeding condition and environmental temperature and that it modulates thermoregulation. © 2009 IBRO.

Estrogen modulates central and peripheral responses to cold in female rats

Uchida, Yuki; Kano, Masumi; Yasuhara, Saki; Kobayashi, Akiko; Tokizawa, Ken; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei

Journal of Physiological Sciences 60(2) p.151 - 1602010/03-2010/03

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ISSN:18806546

Outline:The aim of this study was to determine whether estrogen modulates central and peripheral responses to cold in female rats. In ovariectomized female rats with and without administered estrogen [E 2 (+) and E 2 (-), respectively], the counts of cFos-immunoreactive cells in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPO) and dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) in the hypothalamus were greater in the E 2 (+) rats than in the E 2 (-) rats at 5°C. Examination of the response of normal female rats to exposure to 5°C at different phases of the estrus cycle revealed that counts of cFos-immunoreactive cells in the MPO, DMH, and posterior hypothalamus and the level of uncoupling protein 1 mRNA in the brown adipose tissues were greater in the proestrus phase than on day 1 of the diestrus phase. This result was linked to the level of plasma estrogen. The body temperature during cold exposure was higher in the E 2 (+) rats than in the E 2 (-) rats and was also higher in the proestrus phase than on day 1 of the diestrus phase. We conclude that estrogen may affect central and peripheral responses involved in thermoregulation in the cold. © 2009 The Physiological Society of Japan and Springer.

Ghrelin induces time-dependent modulation of thermoregulation in the cold

Tokizawa, Ken; Tokizawa, Ken; Onoue, Yuki; Uchida, Yuki; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei

Chronobiology International 29(6) p.736 - 7462012/07-2012/07

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ISSN:07420528

Outline:Fasted mice show torpor-like hypothermia in the cold in their inactive phase. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether leptin andor ghrelin are involved in this reaction and to identify its neurophysiological mechanisms. In obob mice, which lack leptin, metabolic heat production (oxygen consumption, Vo2) was suppressed in 20°C cold in both the light and dark phases, resulting in hypothermia. When wild-type mice received a systemic injection of 8g ghrelin in the early light phase, followed by a 2-h cold exposure to 10°C, their core body temperature (Tb) decreased by 1.7°C, and they displayed a less marked increase in Vo2 compared with vehicle-injected mice. However, ghrelin injection in the early dark phase resulted in the maintenance of Tb and increased Vo2 in the mice, which was similar to the result observed in the vehicle-injected mice. The number of doubly labeled neurons with cFos and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was greater in the light phase in the ghrelin-injected mice, which may suggest that ghrelin activates NPY neurons. On the contrary, in the paraventricular nucleus, the counts became greater only when they were exposed to the cold in the dark phase. These results indicate that ghrelin plays an important role in inducing time-dependent changes in thermoregulation in the cold via hypothalamic pathways. © 2012 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

Relative importance of different surface regions for thermal comfort in humans

Nakamura, Mayumi; Nakamura, Mayumi; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoda, Tamae; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Crawshaw, Larry I.; Kasuga, Momoko; Uchida, Yuki; Tokizawa, Ken; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

European Journal of Applied Physiology 113(1) p.63 - 762013/01-2013/01

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ISSN:14396319

Outline:In a previous study, we investigated the contribution of the surface of the face, chest, abdomen, and thigh to thermal comfort by applying local temperature stimulation during whole-body exposure to mild heat or cold. In hot conditions, humans prefer a cool face, and in cold they prefer a warm abdomen. In this study, we extended investigation of regional differences in thermal comfort to the neck, hand, soles, abdomen (Experiment 1), the upper and lower back, upper arm, and abdomen (Experiment 2). The methodology was similar to that used in the previous study. To compare the results of each experiment, we utilized the abdomen as the reference area in these experiments. Thermal comfort feelings were not particularly strong for the limbs and extremities, in spite of the fact that changes in skin temperature induced by local temperature stimulation of the limbs and extremities were always larger than changes that were induced in the more proximal body parts. For the trunk areas, a significant difference in thermal comfort was not observed among the abdomen, and upper and lower back. An exception involved local cooling during whole-body mild cold exposure, wherein the most dominant preference was for a warmer temperature of the abdomen. As for the neck and abdomen, clear differences were observed during local cooling, while no significant difference was observed during local warming. We combined the results for the current and the previous study, and characterized regional differences in thermal comfort and thermal preference for the whole-body surface. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

Cold exposure and/or fasting modulate the relationship between sleep and body temperature rhythms in mice

Sato, Nobuo; Sato, Nobuo; Marui, Shuri; Ozaki, Makoto; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei

Physiology and Behavior 149p.69 - 752015/10-2015/10

PubMedDOIScopus

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ISSN:00319384

Outline:© 2015 Elsevier Inc. We assessed the relationship between core temperature (T c ) and sleep rhythms in mice, and examined the effects of ambient temperature and fasting. T c , electroencephalograms (EEG), electromyograms (EMG), and spontaneous activity in male ICR mice (n=9) were measured by telemetry for 3days under a 12:12h dark-light cycle. Mice were fed or fasted at an ambient temperature (T a ) of 27°C or 20°C for the final 30h of the experiment. The vigilance state was categorized into a wake state, rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep, and the total sleep time (TST) was assessed. Relationships between T c and TST, NREM periods, and REM sleep were estimated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. During cold exposure, T c decreased during the dark and light phases, and TST and the periods of NREM and REM sleep decreased during the dark phase. Throughout the fasting period, T c also decreased during the dark and light phases. Furthermore, the decrease in T c was augmented when fasting and cold were combined. TST and NREM sleep periods decreased in the light and dark phases, respectively, whereas REM sleep periods decreased in both phases. Negative linear correlations (r=-0.884 to -0.987) were observed between T c and TST, NREM sleep periods, and REM sleep periods, except for T c and REM sleep periods where fasting and cold conditions were combined. The correlations between sleep and T c rhythms were well maintained during cold exposure and fasting. However, when cold and fasting were combined, REM sleep and T c rhythms were desynchronized.

Effect of menstrual cycle on thermal perception and autonomic thermoregulatory responses during mild cold exposure

Matsuda-Nakamura, Mayumi; Yasuhara, Saki; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei

Journal of Physiological Sciences 65(4) p.339 - 3472015/07-2015/07

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ISSN:18806546

Outline:© 2015, The Physiological Society of Japan and Springer Japan. We investigated the effects of menstrual cycle phase on thermal sensation, thermal pleasantness, and autonomic thermoregulatory responses during mild cold exposure. Eight healthy young women participated. Experiments were conducted in the follicular and luteal phases: 120 min exposure at 23.5 °C after 40-min at a baseline temperature of 29 °C. Body core temperature was higher (P = 0.01) in the luteal phase than in the follicular phase. Thermal sensation of the whole body (P = 0.59), hands (P = 0.46), and toes (P = 0.94), and thermal pleasantness of the whole body (P = 0.79) were no different between phases. In both phases, mean skin temperature decreased (P = 0.00) in the same manner without any change in metabolic rate (P = 0.90). These results suggest the change of body core temperature in the menstrual cycle phases has no effect on thermal perception of cold or on autonomic cold-defense response.

Scaling properties of fractional momentum loss of high- pT hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions at sNN from 62.4 GeV to 2.76 TeV

Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Bathe, S.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Bok, J. S.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Butsyk, S.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Campbell, S.; Campbell, S.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chen, C. H.; Chen, C. H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.

Physical Review C 93(2) 2016/02-2016/02

DOIScopus

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ISSN:24699985

Outline:© 2016 American Physical Society. Measurements of the fractional momentum loss (Sloss≡δpT/pT) of high-transverse-momentum-identified hadrons in heavy-ion collisions are presented. Using π0 in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and and charged hadrons in Pb+Pb collisions measured by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, we studied the scaling properties of Sloss as a function of a number of variables: the number of participants, Npart, the number of quark participants, Nqp, the charged-particle density, dNch/dη, and the Bjorken energy density times the equilibration time, Bjτ0. We find that the pT, where Sloss has its maximum, varies both with centrality and collision energy. Above the maximum, Sloss tends to follow a power-law function with all four scaling variables. The data at sNN=200 GeV and 2.76 TeV, for sufficiently high particle densities, have a common scaling of Sloss with dNch/dη and Bjτ0, lending insight into the physics of parton energy loss.

Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at sNN =200 GeV

Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Bathe, S.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Campbell, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. H.; Chen, C. H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgo, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, T. W.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.

Physical Review Letters 116(12) 2016/03-2016/03

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ISSN:00319007

Outline:© 2016 American Physical Society. Jet production rates are measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-kt algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12 < pT < 50 GeV/c, within a pseudorapidity acceptance of |η| < 0.3. The nuclear-modification factor (RdAu) values for 0%-100% d+Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. However, the centrality-selected RdAu values and central-to-peripheral ratios (RCP) show large, pT-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.

Influence of osmotic stress on thermal perception and thermoregulation in heat is different between sedentary and trained men

Tokizawa, Ken; Tokizawa, Ken; Matsuda-Nakamura, Mayumi; Tanaka, Yuki; Uchida, Yuki; Lin, Cheng Hsien; Lin, Cheng Hsien; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei

Physiology and Behavior 161p.66 - 732016/07-2016/07

PubMedDOIScopus

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ISSN:00319384

Outline:© 2016. Hyperosmolality in extracellular fluid in humans attenuates autonomic thermoregulation in heat, such as sweating and blood flow in the skin. However, exercise training minimizes the attenuation. The aim of the present study was to clarify the influence of hyperosmolality on thermal perception and to assess the training effect of exercise. Ten sedentary (SED) and 10 endurance-trained (TR) healthy young men were infused with 0.9% (normal saline [NS]) or 3% NaCl (hypertonic saline [HS] ) for 120 min on two separate days. After infusion for 20 min, heat stimulus to the skin of the whole body was produced by a gradual increase in hot water-perfused suit temperature (33 °C, 36 °C, and 39 °C), which was first used in the normothermic condition and then in the mild hyperthermic condition (0.5-0.6 °C increase in esophageal temperature) and controlled by immersion of the lower legs in a water bath at 34.5 °C and 42 °C, respectively. Thermal sensation and comfort were rated at the time of each thermal condition. Plasma osmolality increased by ~10 mosmL/kg·H 2 O in the HS trial. In the mild hyperthermic condition, increases in sweat rate and cutaneous vascular conductance were lower in the HS than in the NS trial in both the SED and TR groups (p < 0.05). In the SED group, thermal sensation in the mild hyperthermic condition was lower in the HS than in the NS trial (p < 0.05); there was no significant difference between the trials in the TR group. These results might indicate that hyperosmolality attenuates thermal sensation with heat and that exercise training eliminates the attenuation.

PHENIX Collaboration

Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Andrews, K. R.; Andrieux, V.; Angerami, A.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Bathe, S.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Batsouli, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Bok, J. S.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Broxmeyer, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.

Nuclear Physics A 956p.964 - 9702016/12-2016/12

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ISSN:03759474

Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females

Fujii, Naoto; Fujii, Naoto; Fujii, Naoto; Aoki-Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P.; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

Physiological Reports 5(20) 2017/11-2017/11

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Outline:© 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise-induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold-sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty-eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold-sensitive (Cold-sensitive, n = 7) and non-cold-sensitive (Control, n = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then performed 30-min of moderate intensity cycling (50% peak oxygen uptake) followed by a 60-min recovery. Core and mean skin temperatures and cold sensation over the whole-body and extremities (fingers and toes) were assessed throughout. Resting core temperature was lower in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group (36.4 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.2°C). Core temperature increased to similar levels at end-exercise (~37.2°C) and gradually returned to near preexercise rest levels at the end of recovery ( > 36.6°C). Whole-body cold sensation was greater in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group during resting at a room temperature of 23.5°C only without a difference in mean skin temperature between groups. In contrast, cold sensation of the extremities was greater in the Cold-sensitive group prior to, during and following exercise albeit this was not paralleled by differences in mean extremity skin temperature. We show that young trained females who are sensitive to cold exhibit augmented whole-body cold sensation during rest under temperate ambient conditions. However, this response is diminished during and following exercise. In contrast, cold sensation of extremities is augmented during resting that persists during and following exercise.

Regional differences of cFos immunoreactive cells in the preoptic areas in hypothalamus associated with heat and cold responses in mice

Uchida, Yuki; Uchida, Yuki; Onishi, Keisuke; Onishi, Keisuke; Tokizawa, Ken; Tokizawa, Ken; Nagashima, Kei; Nagashima, Kei

Neuroscience Letters 665p.130 - 1342018/02-2018/02

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ISSN:03043940

Outline:© 2017 Elsevier B.V. cFos expression in the preoptic area (PO), which is thermoregulatory center increased by both heat and cold exposures; however, the regional difference is unknown yet. We aimed to determine if cFos expression in the PO was regionally different between heat and cold exposures. Mice were exposed to 27, 10, or 38 °C for 90 min, and body temperature (T b ) was measured. cFos-immunoreactive (cFos-IR) cells in the PO were counted by separating the PO into the ventral and dorsal parts in the rostral (bregma 0.38 mm), central (−0.10 mm), and caudal (−0.46 mm) planes. T b at 10 °C remained unchanged; however, it increased at 38 °C. Counts of cFos-IR cells in all areas were greater at 38 °C than at 27 °C. In the dorsal and ventral parts of the central and the dorsal part of caudal PO, counts of cFos-IR cells were greater at 10 °C than at 27 °C. In conclusion, the areas of increased cFos expression in the PO in the heat were different that in the cold in mice.

Physiological and psychological responses to color lights under cold water immersion test

Guo Yang;Saito Miho;Oza Keiichi;Tokizawa Ken;Nagashima Kei

37(1) p.15 - 262013-2013

CiNii

Detail

ISSN:03899357

Outline:The purpose of this study was to examine the physiological and psychological responses to color lights during cold water immersion test. Ten female subjects aged between 20 to 30 years were asked to immerse their left hand in 15℃ water for 3 minutes respectively under white, blue and red color light. The subjects' skin temperature, skin blood flow, blood pressure and electrocardiogram were continuously measured. At the meantime, psychological questionnaires were conducted, focusing on subjects' impression of the color lights, mood, thermesthesia, cold discomfort, and subjective feelings of temperature recovery during the test. The physiological results indicate that under blue color light, reduced skin temperature under cold water immersion recovered relatively faster compared to other color lights. Skin blood flow also recovered faster under blue color light. The psychological results show difference in the impression among 3 color lights in terms of "pleasant" and "warm and cool". Meanwhile, subjects' mood and thermesthesia were different to each color lights. Specifically, blue color light, evaluated as cool color was considered increasing the discomfort of cold, thus leading to emotional arousal. On the other hand, red color light, evaluated as warm color was considered decreasing the discomfort of cold. In this study, as the characteristic of blue color light, emotional arousal was estimated associated with skin sympathetic nerve inhibition. This study may suggest color lights affect mood, thermesthesia and thermoregulation through cognitive process.

Books And Publication

ニュー運動生理学Ⅱ(共著)

宮村美晴編

真興交易株式会社、医書出版部2015/01-

ぬくぬくげんきぼくのたいおん

永島 計

少年写真新聞社2014/11-

小児内科

永島計

東京医学社2014-

ニュー運動生理学(共著)

永島計

真興貿易2014-

スタンダード生理学第3版(編著)

二宮石雄、安藤啓司、彼末一之、松川寛二編集

文光堂2013/09-

Detali

ISBN:978-4-8306-0227-6

Wilderness Medicine

Paul S. Auerbach(編著)

Mosby2011/12-

Detali

ISBN:978-1437716788

運動と免疫

大野秀樹、木崎節子(編著)

NAP2009/09-

Detali

ISBN:978-4-931411-88-3

体温II

井上 芳光, 近藤 徳彦 (編著)

NAP2010/12-

Detali

ISBN:978-4931411005

からだと温度の辞典

彼末一之監修

朝倉書店2010/04-

身体トレーニング

共著

真興交易(株)医書出版部2009/03-

Detali

ISBN:978-4-88003-826-1

解体新ショー(監修)

NHK出版2008/06-

「健康福祉」 人間科学(編著)

朝倉書店2008/06-

健康運動指導マニュアル(編著)

文光堂2008/02-

スタンダード生理学第二版(編著)

文光堂2007-

環境生理学(共著)

北海道大学出版会2007-

スタンダード生理学(編著)

文光堂2002-

体温

平田 耕造, 近藤 徳彦, 井上 芳光 (編著)

NAP2002/09-

Detali

ISBN:978-4931411319

運動と遺伝(編著)

大修館書店2001-

The Central Organization of the Thermoregulatory System Thermotherapy for Neoplasia Inflammation, and Pain

編著

2001-

新運動生理学(編著)

真興交易2001-

Cardiac filling and lactate concentration in plasma during exercise in a hot environment The 1997 Nagano Symposium on Sports Sciences

I. L. Cooper1998-

Role of plasma osmolality in the exercise-induced inhibition of cutaneous vasodilation

編著

1998-

Cardiac filling and lactate concentration in plasma during exercise in a hot environment

編著

1998-

Cardiac filling and lactate threshold during graded exercise The 5th Annual Pacific Rim Conference on Exercise Science and Sports Medicine; Exercise and the Human Body

編著

Chosun-University1998-

The role of albumin in the hypervolemia of exercise. In The 1997 Nagano Symposium on Sports Science

編著

Cooper Publishing1998-

Effect of hydration level on thermoregulatory responses during exercise in rats Thermal Physiology 1997

編著

The August Krogh Institute1997-

Osmotic inhibition of thermally induced cutaneous vasodilation in humans and its role in the inhibition of cutaneous vasodilation during exercise Thermal Physiology 1997

編著

The August Krogh Institute, Copenhagen1997-

Negative pressure breathing and the control of skin blood flow during exercise in a hot environment Thermoregulation

編著

Annals of the New York Academy of Science1997-

Cardiovascular response to exercise in a hot environment Progress in Biometeology vol. 11 Physiological basis of occupational health: Stressful environment

編著

SPB Academic Publishing1996-

Lecture And Oral

Daily exercise may aleter anti-oxydative responses to heat in mouse brain

Experimental Biology 20152015/03/29

Detail

Poster presentation

Deprivation of plasma estradiol level affects circadian rhythms of body core and tail skin temperature in ovariectomized rats

Experimental Biology 20152015/03

Detail

Poster presentation

Reduction of plasma estradiol level affects daily rhythms of body core and tail skin temperature in female rats

2015/03/22

Detail

Poster presentation

Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative responses during hyperthermia in mice brain and the effect of daily exercise

2015/03/21

Detail

Poster presentation

The hypothalamus is not involved in cause of heat stroke

PPTR20142014/09/10

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

The influence of estrogen on circadian rhythms of heart rates and cardiac sympathetic nerve in female rats

Experimental Biology20142014/04

Detail

Poster presentation

The effect of the head or neck cooling on body core temperature and thermal pleasantness in humans

2014/03/16

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

Ultradian rhythm of bodytemperature and its relation to wake-sleep rhythm

Thermal Physiology Conference2013/09/06

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

The effect of estrogen on blood pressure fluctuation in female rats

Thermal Physiology Conference2013/09/05

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

The effect of head or neck cooling on body core temperature

Thermal Physiology Conference2013/09/05

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

Blood osmolality modulates skin blood flow and thermoregulation: from human to animal study and the central to periphery

The 9th scientific conference on cardiocascular sciences across the strait2013/08/16

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

Blood osmolality modulates skin blood flow and thermoregulation: from human to animal study and the central to periphery

The 9th scientific conference on cardiocascular sciences across the strait2013/08

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

The influence of estrogen on circadian rhythms of body temperature and heart rates in female rats

IUPS20132013/07

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

Exercise training activates behavioral thermoregulation in mice

IUPS20132013/07

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

The effect of spontaneous running wheel exercise on behavioral thermoregulation in heat and thermal preference in mice:a possible role of the central

90th Annual meeting of Japanese Physiological Society2013/03/27

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

Fasting affects thermoregulation and hypothalamic Fos expressions in the cold,depending on time of the day

The 31st Annual Meeting of the Japan Neuroscience Society2008/07

Detail

Poster presentation

Effect of hypothalamic application of 17-B estradiol on thermoregulation in a cold environment

The 31st Annual Meeting of the Japan Neuroscience Society2008/07

Detail

Poster presentation

The impact of estrogen on thermoregulatory response to the cold in female rats

The 31st Annual Meeting of the Japan Neuroscience Society2008/07

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

Fasting affects thermoregulation in the cold,depending on time of the day

EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 20082008/04

Detail

Poster presentation

The influence of exercise-induced dehydration on thermal sensation and comfort

EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 20082008/04

Detail

Poster presentation

Effect of central application of 17-B estradiol on thermoregulation during a cold exposure in female rats

EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 20082008/04

Detail

Poster presentation

The influence of exercise induced dehydration on thermal sensation and comfort

The 85th Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan2008/03

Detail

Poster presentation

The regional characteristics of temperature-related sensations.

The 85th Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan2008/03

Detail

Poster presentation

Effect of hypothalamic application of 17- {beta}-estradiol on thermoregulation during a cold exposure in female rats

The 85th Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan2008/03

Detail

Poster presentation

Difference in thermoregulation between dark and light phase of fasted mice

The 85th Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan2008/03

Detail

Poster presentation

Estrus cycle modulates thermoregulatory responses to the cold in rats

The 85th Annual Meeting of the Physiological Society of Japan2008/03

Detail

Oral presentation(general)

Research Grants & Projects

Grant-in-aids for Scientific Research Adoption Situation

Research Classification:

Analysis of functional connection of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus for themoregulation

Allocation Class:¥15200000

Research Classification:

Analysis of changes in body temperature rhythm during fasting

Allocation Class:¥3600000

Research Classification:

Relationship between exercise-induced hypervolemia and albumin synthesis and distribution in the body

Allocation Class:¥600000

Research Classification:

Analysis of efferent projection from the preoptic area for the control of thermoregulatory effector responses.

Allocation Class:¥35640000

Research Classification:

Systems for analysing thermal emotion (behavioral thermoregulation)

Allocation Class:¥13300000

Research Classification:

Examination of the hyposesis of thermoredulatory module in the hypothalamus.

Allocation Class:¥12900000

Research Classification:

Clarifying mechanisms involved in thermal pleasantness/unpleasantness and the application for evaluation of the inside environment of clothes

2013/-0-2017/-0

Allocation Class:¥16900000

Research Classification:

Development of a method of reducing heat strain at recovery work for destroyed Nuclear Power Plant and construction work in Summer

2013/-0-2017/-0

Allocation Class:¥10530000

Research Classification:

Comprehensive Analysis of the mechanism involved in changes of thermoregulatory responses during dehydration

Allocation Class:¥17290000

Research Classification:

Clarification of the mechanisms involved in circadian body temperature rhythm and its physiological significance

Allocation Class:¥15230000

Research Classification:

Mechanisms involved in heat tolerance due to depletion of estradiol secretion

2016/-0-2018/-0

Allocation Class:¥3640000

Research Classification:

Physiology and Psychology of Humidity and Wetness

2019/-0-2023/-0

Allocation Class:¥38090000

On-campus Research System

Special Research Project

湿度が与える感性、生理への影響の探索

2018Collaborator:中田大貴, 丸井朱里, 増田雄太, 加藤一聖, 眞野博彰

Research Results Outline:“湿度”や“皮膚表面の濡れ”は、ヒトの体温調節に大きな影響を与える因子であり、衣服素材の開発や室内環境設計などの応用面からも重要な研究対象である.湿度“湿度”や“皮膚表面の濡れ”は、ヒトの体温調節に大きな影響を与える因子であり、衣服素材の開発や室内環境設計などの応用面からも重要な研究対象である.湿度や皮膚表面の濡れは、“蒸れ感”、“濡れ感”として我々の意識にのぼり、温熱的な不快感につながる.また...“湿度”や“皮膚表面の濡れ”は、ヒトの体温調節に大きな影響を与える因子であり、衣服素材の開発や室内環境設計などの応用面からも重要な研究対象である.湿度や皮膚表面の濡れは、“蒸れ感”、“濡れ感”として我々の意識にのぼり、温熱的な不快感につながる.また、物理的に発汗(蒸散性熱放散)の効率を低下させ、汗腺での汗の生成を抑制する.しかし、ヒトの濡れセンサーは同定されていない.さらに、皮膚表面の濡れの受容を起点とした体温調節反応のメカニズムは未知である.研究では、行動実験と機能的脳画像法(fMRI)を用いて、①濡れ感に関わる脳部位を同定し、②温冷感と圧覚の2つの異なる感覚から形成されると推察される濡れ感を、脳内情報伝達解析により明らかにすることを目指した。本年度は、①②に関わる行動実験を行い、MRIを用いた実験の基礎的研究を行った。また、以前から行っていた関連する温熱感覚に関わるMRI実験を完成し、論文化した。2019年度以後の基盤研究Aに本課題が採択され、研究の発展が可能となった。

体温調節機構としての視交叉上核の役割の解明

2004

Research Results Outline:緒言 恒温動物には体温を一定に保つための優れたシステムが存在するが一方体温には明確な概日リズムが存在することが知られている。これは身体活動や代謝の活動緒言 恒温動物には体温を一定に保つための優れたシステムが存在するが一方体温には明確な概日リズムが存在することが知られている。これは身体活動や代謝の活動により二次的に生じたものではなく積極的に調節されるものであることが申請者らの研究により明らかになっ...緒言 恒温動物には体温を一定に保つための優れたシステムが存在するが一方体温には明確な概日リズムが存在することが知られている。これは身体活動や代謝の活動により二次的に生じたものではなく積極的に調節されるものであることが申請者らの研究により明らかになってきている。目的 研究では生物時計の最上位中枢と考えられている脳視床下部の視交差上核がいかに体温調節反応を変化させ体温のリズムを形成しているかを明らかにしていくことを目的とした。実験1 ラットの視交叉上核を電気的に破壊し、十分な回復の後、高温(33度)、低温(18度)に暴露させこの際の体温調節を調べた。次に体内の熱産生を低下させる強い刺激である絶食をおこなった上で同様に体温の変動を測定した。結果 視交叉上核の破壊により体温のリズムは消失するが、いずれの環境温、摂食状態においても体温は一定に保たれた。しかし非破壊ラットにおいては絶食時に体温の低下が非活動期において認められた。さらに非破壊ラットにおいては環境温度の変動に対し熱産生量を変動させ体温を調節させるのに対し、視交叉上核破壊ラットではそのような反応が減弱していた。また摂食情報の伝達には迷走神経が重要な役割を果たしていることが付随する研究で明らかになった。実験2 時計遺伝子Cryの欠損マウスを用いてその体温の変動と熱産生の変動の関係を調べた。結果 Cryの欠損マウスでは体温の変動は熱産生の変動に依存している。一方正常マウスでは熱産生の変動に対しても体温を一定に保つメカニズムが存在した。結論 視交叉上核またその活動に反映する時計遺伝子は体温調節反応の制御に関わっていると考えられた。また摂食あるいは代謝の情報を視交叉上核はうけているとかんがえられ、さらに体温調節に影響をあたえていると推測される。上記研究結果についてはAmerican Journal of Physiology、Autonomic Neuroscienceに現在投稿中である。

体温の運動パフォーマンスに与える影響の解析ー温熱的快不快感を尺度としてー

2007Collaborator:時澤 健

Research Results Outline:[目的]運動に伴う脱水は、発汗•皮膚血管拡張などの自律性体温調節反応の抑制を引き起こし、体温調節能の低下とともに、熱中症などにつながる。自[目的]運動に伴う脱水は、発汗•皮膚血管拡張などの自律性体温調節反応の抑制を引き起こし、体温調節能の低下とともに、熱中症などにつながる。自律性体温調節とともに人では衣服の着脱、エアコンのオン•オフなどの行動性体温調節があり、...[目的]運動に伴う脱水は、発汗•皮膚血管拡張などの自律性体温調節反応の抑制を引き起こし、体温調節能の低下とともに、熱中症などにつながる。自律性体温調節とともに人では衣服の着脱、エアコンのオン•オフなどの行動性体温調節があり、自律性体温調節に対して相補的に働くと言われている。しかしながら、脱水時に行動性体温調節がいかに変化するかは未知のままである。今回の研究では、脱水時の行動性体温調節がいかに変化するのかを、人の行動性体温調節の動機である温度感覚•温熱的快不快感を指標に調べた。[方法]健康成人男子(22-28 y.o.)を対象にした。実験は2つの試行を1週間以上の間隔をおいて行った。1つめの試行は24°Cの環境下に~10%HRmaxの運動を、2つめの試行は35°Cの環境下に40%HRmaxの運動を各々40分間行った。その後27°Cから22°Cの環境まで、次に27°Cから38°Cの環境まで変化させこの間、深部体温、表面皮膚温、発汗率、皮膚血流、温度感覚、温熱的快不快感を測定し、運動前後•実験終了後の血液を採取した。[結果] 35°Cの環境下での運動では約1%体重の脱水が生じ、その後38°Cの環境で発汗、皮膚血流量の抑制が、24°Cの環境下での運動後の値に比較して見られ、深部体温も上昇した。しかしながら、温度感覚/温熱的快不快感については両者に差は見られなかった。[結論]暑熱下運動による軽度の脱水後にも、暑熱環境に暴露させると発汗、皮膚血流などの自律性体温調節反応が低下し、深部体温の上昇が見られた。しかしながら、温度感覚/温熱的快不快感には差が認められず、人においては自律性体温調節に対して行動性体温調節の動機となると予想される温度感覚/温熱的快不快感が相補的に亢進する証拠は認められなかった。

生物時計と体温概日リズム形成の間のシグナルパスウエイの解明

2009

Research Results Outline:【目的】本研究は1)絶食が体温調節反応に及ぼす影響を暗期(活動期)と明期(非活動期)に分けて解析し,体温調節にかかわる脳視床下部での神経核、生物リズム【目的】本研究は1)絶食が体温調節反応に及ぼす影響を暗期(活動期)と明期(非活動期)に分けて解析し,体温調節にかかわる脳視床下部での神経核、生物リズムの形成にかかわっていると考えられている時計遺伝子の一つであるClockとの関与を明らかにすること、...【目的】本研究は1)絶食が体温調節反応に及ぼす影響を暗期(活動期)と明期(非活動期)に分けて解析し,体温調節にかかわる脳視床下部での神経核、生物リズムの形成にかかわっていると考えられている時計遺伝子の一つであるClockとの関与を明らかにすること、2)低体温を引き起こすシグナルとしてグレリンの関与を調べた.【方法】実験1:マウスの体温と活動量を連続測定し,2日間の絶食を行った.絶食開始時刻は午前9時もしくは午後9時とし,各々この時間の47時間後,午前8時(明期)と午後8時(暗期)に,20ºCの寒冷暴露を行った.脳のcFosタンパクの免疫組織化学染色を行った.時計遺伝子Clockの変異マウスを用いて,同様の実験を行った.実験2:野生型マウスにグレリン(8 nmol)または生食を午前8時(明期)と午後8時(暗期)投与し、10℃の寒冷暴露を行った.【結果】実験1:絶食明期寒冷暴露時には,体温は30分目以降低下したが酸素摂取量に変化はなかった.絶食暗期寒冷暴露時には,130分目以降低下し,酸素摂取量は増加した.体温の低下は明期に暗期と比較して大きく,酸素摂取量の増加は暗期が明期に大きかった.視床下部のcFos免疫陽性細胞数は,内側視索前野および室傍核で暗期寒冷暴露に増加した.視交叉上核では,絶食、寒冷暴露によりcFosは増加した.Clock変異マウスでは,明期と暗期の間に差はみられなかった.実験2:グレリンを投与したマウスにおいて、明期の寒冷暴露により体温は低下した.酸素摂取量は低かった.暗期では、グレリン投与後の寒冷暴露により体温は低下せず酸素摂取量は増加した.cFos-は視交叉上核において明期にグレリン投与により増加した.【考察】1.摂食条件は体温調節に大きく関わっており,絶食時には寒冷時の体温調節反応を時間特異的に抑制することが明らかになった.時間特異的に抑制するメカニズムに時計遺伝子Clockが関与していることが明らかになった. 2.絶食時の低体温は調節された現象と考えられるが、絶食に伴い増加するグレリンは絶食時の時間特異的な体温調節に関与していると考えられる。

時間ー体温ー摂食を統合する視床下部神経ネットワークの解析

2010Collaborator:時澤、健

Research Results Outline:我々は絶食によって寒冷時の体温調節反応が弱められることを報告している(Tokizawa et al. Neuroscience 2009)。その反応は我々は絶食によって寒冷時の体温調節反応が弱められることを報告している(Tokizawa et al. Neuroscience 2009)。その反応は、マウスにおいて暗期と比べて明期(非活動期)に特に大きく弱められる。この時間特異性のメカニズムとし...我々は絶食によって寒冷時の体温調節反応が弱められることを報告している(Tokizawa et al. Neuroscience 2009)。その反応は、マウスにおいて暗期と比べて明期(非活動期)に特に大きく弱められる。この時間特異性のメカニズムとして、時計遺伝子Clockおよび視交叉上核の神経活動亢進に伴う室傍核の活動抑制が関与することを我々は明らかにしている。しかし、絶食によって引き起こされるどのような因子が体温調節反応を減弱させるのか、また時間特異的な反応を引き起こすのかは明らかではない。そこで本研究では、絶食によって変化する摂食ペプチド(レプチンの低下、グレリンの増加)が時間特異的な体温調節反応に関与しているか否かを検証することを目的として行った。【2010年度 進捗状況報告】実験1:野生型およびレプチンを欠損するob/obマウスを、27℃の環境温で12h-12hの明暗サイクル(午前7時(ZT0)点灯,午後7時(ZT12)消灯)で飼育した。体温および活動量の概日リズムが確認された後、20℃の寒冷暴露を明期(ZT1~4)または暗期(ZT13~16)に行った。実験2:野生型マウスにおいて、腹腔内にグレリン(8 nmol)をZT1またはZT13に投与し、10℃の寒冷暴露を明期(ZT2~4)または暗期(ZT14~16)に行った。対照として、生理食塩水を投与する試行も行った。両実験において、寒冷暴露時の深部体温と活動量をテレメトリー、酸素摂取量を間接的カロリメトリーにてそれぞれ測定した。また寒冷暴露直後に脳を採取し、神経活動のマーカーであるc-Fos蛋白の免疫組織化学染色を行った。【結果】実験1:野生型マウスにおいては明期と暗期ともに、寒冷暴露によって深部体温は変化しなかった。また酸素摂取量は有意に増加した。ob/obマウスにおいて、寒冷暴露により深部体温は有意に低下した。明期と暗期の間で有意な差は認められなかった(明期、3.8 ± 0.8℃;暗期2.1 ± 0.3℃)。寒冷暴露によって酸素摂取量は増加したものの、野生型と比較して有意に低かった。c-Fos蛋白の免疫陽性細胞数は、視床下部のいずれの神経核においても野生型とob/obマウスの間で有意な差は認められなかった。実験2:グレリンを投与した野生型マウスにおいて、明期の寒冷暴露によって深部体温は生理食塩水投与と比較して有意に低下した。また酸素摂取量は増加したものの、生理食塩水投与と比較して有意に低かった。一方暗期においては、グレリン投与試行の寒冷暴露によって深部体温は低下せず酸素摂取量は有意に増加し、生理食塩水投与との間に有意な差は認められなかった。c-Fos蛋白の免疫陽性細胞数は、視交叉上核において明期にグレリン投与によって有意に増加した。また弓状核においては、明期と暗期ともにグレリン投与によってc-Fos蛋白の免疫陽性細胞数は増加したものの、暗期の方で増加は大きかった。室傍核において、グレリン投与のみではc-Fos発現は見られなかったものの、グレリン投与で寒冷暴露を行った暗期においては、c-Fos蛋白の免疫陽性細胞数は有意に増加した。【結論】レプチンの欠損は体温調節反応を弱めるが、絶食時に見られる時間特異的な体温調節反応の減弱には関与しないことが示唆された。一方グレリンの増加は、時間特異的に明期にのみ体温調節反応を弱める可能性が示唆され、絶食時に見られる時間特異的な体温調節に関与する可能性が考えられた。

脳視床下部の酸化ストレス/抗酸化反応からみた熱中症発症、暑熱耐性獲得機序の解明

2014Collaborator:丸井朱里, 綱川みずき, 小幡千紗

Research Results Outline: 熱中症の最も根源的な問題は、体温調節能が破綻することにある。特に体温調節中枢である視床下部の機能の破綻が予想されているが、明確な証拠は提示 熱中症の最も根源的な問題は、体温調節能が破綻することにある。特に体温調節中枢である視床下部の機能の破綻が予想されているが、明確な証拠は提示されていない。本研究ではマウスが暑熱暴露された際に、視床下部で高体温による障害が生じやすくなるのか... 熱中症の最も根源的な問題は、体温調節能が破綻することにある。特に体温調節中枢である視床下部の機能の破綻が予想されているが、明確な証拠は提示されていない。本研究ではマウスが暑熱暴露された際に、視床下部で高体温による障害が生じやすくなるのか/あるいは障害を防ぐ機序が存在するのかを酸化/抗酸化反応のバランスから評価を試みた。また、暑熱耐性が生じると言われる運動の効果を評価した。

ウエアラブルセンサーを用いた集団生理学の確立

2017

Research Results Outline:運動時の安全、快適性、パフォーマンス、トレーニング効果の点から、個体間の環境応答の差異を研究対象とすることを目指し、生理学データの集団測定を行う基本技運動時の安全、快適性、パフォーマンス、トレーニング効果の点から、個体間の環境応答の差異を研究対象とすることを目指し、生理学データの集団測定を行う基本技術を確立することを目指した.被験者は高校ハンドボール選手5名を対象に5日の異なる日に実験を行なった...運動時の安全、快適性、パフォーマンス、トレーニング効果の点から、個体間の環境応答の差異を研究対象とすることを目指し、生理学データの集団測定を行う基本技術を確立することを目指した.被験者は高校ハンドボール選手5名を対象に5日の異なる日に実験を行なった。グランドでの運動時に1台のスマートフォンを保持し、ウエアラブルセンサーを用いて耳道温度、心拍数(MIOLINK)を連続測定し、bluetoothにてデータ採取した. 3D加速度センサー(OMORON•HJA-750C)を保持し、体重をもとに運動時の仕事量を連続測定した.フィールドにおいても生理学的パラメータの測定が可能であることが明らかになった。

ラット暑熱暴露時の体幹深部、脳内温度較差の評価

2015Collaborator:綱川みずき, 丸井朱里

Research Results Outline:研究では熱中症の発症機序として、脳内の温度上昇、また高温による酸化ストレスの亢進が生じているのではないかと仮定し、実験を進めた。暑熱暴露したラットの脳研究では熱中症の発症機序として、脳内の温度上昇、また高温による酸化ストレスの亢進が生じているのではないかと仮定し、実験を進めた。暑熱暴露したラットの脳温、特に視床下部の温度は、他の体深部の温度より低く、何んらかの保護機構があるのではないかと考えられ...研究では熱中症の発症機序として、脳内の温度上昇、また高温による酸化ストレスの亢進が生じているのではないかと仮定し、実験を進めた。暑熱暴露したラットの脳温、特に視床下部の温度は、他の体深部の温度より低く、何んらかの保護機構があるのではないかと考えられた。しかし、酸化ストレスは脳内で変化はなく、高体温は脳内のいずれの部位でも一様に、酸化ストレスを与える可能性が示された。

脳内酸化・抗酸化バランスからみた熱中症発症機転の解明

2016Collaborator:小幡千紗, 綱川みづき

Research Results Outline:平常体温のマウスの脳において、抗酸化酵素であるsuperoxide dismutase (SOD) 2のタンパク発現が脳表部で脳底部に比べて多いことを平常体温のマウスの脳において、抗酸化酵素であるsuperoxide dismutase (SOD) 2のタンパク発現が脳表部で脳底部に比べて多いことを明らかにしている(p=0.001;脳表部 1.3±0.11、脳底部 0.3±0...平常体温のマウスの脳において、抗酸化酵素であるsuperoxide dismutase (SOD) 2のタンパク発現が脳表部で脳底部に比べて多いことを明らかにしている(p=0.001;脳表部 1.3±0.11、脳底部 0.3±0.05)。さらに、暑熱暴露後のSOD2のタンパク発現を調べたところ、脳表部では正常体温に比べて減少していたが(p=0.001;正常体温時 1.3±0.11、高体温時 0.8±0.05)、脳底部では差が見られなかった(p>0.05;正常体温時 0.3±0.05、高体温時 0.3±0.03)。この現象の生理学的意義は明らかではない。 本研究では以下の実験仮説をたて、その検証を行った。①暑熱暴露時には脳表部の温度が上がりやすく、その防御機転の一つとして抗酸化酵素が細胞中に多く含まれている、②脳底部では暑熱暴露時に脳温の上昇を防ぐなんらかのメカニズムが存在し、抗酸化酵素は少なく、暑熱暴露の影響も小さい。実験では、高体温時のラットの視床下部および海馬の温度を直接計測し、免疫組織化学的手法により抗酸化酵素およびROSの分布を調べた。 傾向としてはSOD2の発現は免疫組織科学染色では脳表に多く認められ、また暑熱暴露時のROS産生は多い傾向が見られた。また、脳内での温度の較差が認められた。

Foreign Countries Research Activity

Research Project Title: 脱水時に見られる体温調節変化のメカニズムの全容解析

2009/04-2010/03

Affiliation: ウロンゴン大学(オーストラリア)

Lecture Course

Course TitleSchoolYearTerm
Studies of Life Science ASchool of Human Sciences2019fall quarter
Studies of Life Science BSchool of Human Sciences2019winter quarter
PhysiologySchool of Human Sciences2019fall semester
Seminar II (Environmental Physiology)School of Human Sciences2019fall semester
Essential Medicine in Health Science and Social WelfareSchool of Human Sciences2019fall semester
Researches for Body Temperature and Fluid PhysiologyGraduate School of Human Sciences2019spring semester
Researches for Body Temperature and Fluid PhysiologyGraduate School of Human Sciences2019fall semester
Body Temperature and Fluid PhysiologyGraduate School of Human Sciences2019fall semester
Body Temperature and Fluid PhysiologyGraduate School of Human Sciences2019fall semester
Basics of Health and Life SciencesGraduate School of Human Sciences2019fall quarter
Body Temperature and Fluid PhysiologyGraduate School of Human Sciences2019winter quarter
Human Movement Science Based on Bernstein's Idea of "Coordination"Graduate School of Human Sciences2019summer
Oriental ways of controlling body and dietGraduate School of Human Sciences2019an intensive course(spring)
Researches for Body Temperature and Fluid Physiology(D) AGraduate School of Human Sciences2019spring semester
Researches for Body Temperature and Fluid Physiology(D) BGraduate School of Human Sciences2019fall semester
Brain Sciences for beginningGlobal Education Center2019spring

Waseda Course Channel Video Service

Course TitleFacultyPublication Year

Created Textbook And Teaching Material And Reference Book

CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE

2001/10

Others Educational Activity

Heat Stroke